Oct 282017
 

The Honour Roll Committee put together a listing of veterans of those who served the community. The Blended Heritage History Committee compiled the local history book: Blended heritage which is now re-published with permissions on line at Our Roots Nos Racines.

Included here are those who gave the supreme sacrifice in service to their country as noted;

  • William Baynton World War One
  • Angus Bell.
  • Torindo Bisaro
  • Lorne Elliot World War One
  • Joe Giebault
  • Sgt. Don Havard
  • Wilbert McCallum
  • Lieut. Fred Mullins Scottish Regiment
  • Charlie Niven
  • Reuben W. Orr R.C.A.F.
  • Marc Paradis
  • Ernest Paron
  • Charlie Prongua
  • Leonard Riggs
  • Percy Rogers World War One
  • Glen Stewart
  • ? Seigel
  • George Wood World War One

In the grey twilight of the autumn eves,
It sighed as it sang through the dying leaves:
“Ye think with regret that the world was bright,
That your path was short and your task was light;
The path, though short, was perhaps the best
And the toil was sweet, that it led to rest.”
John McCrae

Oct 282017
 

Sovereign is a village east of Rosetown on the north east quarter of section 26 township 29 range 13 west of the third meridian. The Sovereign Historical Group remembered those fallen in the Great War, the war to end all wars in their local history book entitled: Mileposts to memories Sovereign, Saskatchewan published 1981.  Additionally, veterans were recorded in the book from the two great wars

“Bid them be patient, and some day, anon,

They shall feel earth enwrapt in silence deep;

Shall greet, in wonderment, the quiet dawn,

And in content may turn them to their sleep. ~John McCrae”

      World War One 1914- 1918 Honour Roll

 

      Killed in Action

    • J.S.W. Ironsides
    • D.W. Goodwin
    • Arthur McDonald
    • Leonard Adams
    • W.E. Bigwood

Missing in Action

  • G.F. Melrose
Nov 262016
 

For King and County
Members of
Carnduff Community
Who have volunteered for Active Service
with
Canada’s Fighting Forces.

On pages 198, 199 and 200 of the local history book, A Stake in the West,, the Carnduff and district history committe came together to record local residents who served in the military forces. The listing includes veterans and those who gave the supreme sacrifice. Recorded here, are just those who fell in the Great War (1914-1918), and the honour roll for World War II (1939-1945) killed in action. Albert SARGENT, served with the King’s Own Yorkshire Infantry, Albert, having been born in England, immigrated in 1915, and following employment at Carnduff, was called to serve in the Great War, enlisting and engaging in the theatre of war overseas. On August 24, 1915, he paid the supreme sacrifice. Charles SARGENT, was one of three children born to David S. Sargent. Charles and his brother, D. Roy, both enlisted in World War I and served in the 232nd Battalion. Charley serving as a sergeant, and Roy as Lieutenant. In 1918, Charles, fell at Arras, France, Roy returned to Canada, and remained in military service. Andrew Grey COWIE Jr. ENLISTED jUNE 1916, IN THE 152nd Battalion. Andrew (Grey) was born July 28, 1893 in Ontario, and in 1905 came with his family to the Oakley school district of Saskatchewan where his father Andrew Grey COWIE filed a homestead. While overseas, Andrew Grey COWIE Jr. was transfered to the 32nd Battalion in 1916, and from there, he was moved to the 5th Battalion. Grey, became Lance-Sergeant April 17, and August 3, 1917, tragically suffered fatal wounds, and is buried in France. Grey received the British War Medal, and the Victory Medal. In 1940, Wesley BAILEY went and joined the Air Force for World War II. As a Flight Sergeant, Wesley, spent time overseas, and tragically, his plane was gunned down over Germany, and he was killed in action September 30, 1943. His brother, Fred BAILEY, also joined the Armed Forces and served between summer of 1941 to the summer of 1944, also in the Air Force, Fred, suffered an injury, and returned home to recuperate. By engaging in the pages of A Stake in the West, and the submitted family histories, brief biographies may be forthcoming about the following soldiers. Lest we Forget.

World War I:
ARCHER, Sid.
BAYLISS, F.
BAILEY, Gerald W.
COWIE, Grey
COSGROVE, B.V.
ELLIOT, Jas.
FAIR, Frank
JACKSON, W.M.C.
JOLIFFE, G.C.
LEE, Roy
LEWIS, A.S.
MILLIONS, C.C.
PACK. D.F.
PALMER, Wm
PATON, Lawrence
RAMSEY, Jas
RENDER, M.
RYCKMAN, Thos.
SARGENT, Albert
SARGENT, Charles
SPARLING, H.C.
STEPHENSON, T.
TURNBULL, Alex.
WILLIS, M.

World War II.
COZIER, Lloyd D.
FORSYTH, John H.
HULL, Wilbert
NORTON, Trueman E.
RAMSEY, Donald R.
TAYLOR, William
THOMPSON, Clifford
VASS, Daniel P.
WHITE, William H.

Keep the Home Fires Burning.
The following are the men (so far as we can learn) who have joined the colours from this town and district. We shall be glad to add other names if friends will post us.
Capt. W.T. Lockhart, C.A.M.C.
Capt. L.A. Smith, 152nd
Lieut. A.S. Lewis, Welsh Res.
Lieut. D.R. Sargent, 152nd
Segt. V.B. Preston, R.C.D.
Lce-Cpl. A.V. Burnell, R.C.D.
Lcr-Cpl. R. C. Burnell, R.C.D.
Trpr G.L. Taylor, R.C.D.
Pte. L. Hargrave.
Trpr G.M. Southcomb, R.C.D.
Trpr John Davidson, R.C.D.
Pte. R. Stawell.
Pte. W.D. Matheson
Pte. H.J. Robertson,
Pte. R. Lowney
Pte. H.C. Sparling, 1st D.A.P.,
Pte. Sid Archer, British Res.
Trpr Thos. Boyce
Trpt Jas. Critchlow.
Trpr Robert Horseman
Trpr William Jones
Trpr Mark Simpson
Trpr. E. Mathews
Trpr A.J. Farr, 10th C.M.R.
Pte. Fred Lane
Pte Ewart Wright, 78th
Pte. R.A. Branson
Pte. C.M. Husband
Pte. G.R. Ramsey, 48th
Pte. H.C. Wake, 48th
Pte. John Burke
Pte. Fred Kyle, Maeb Trans.
Pte. Frank Marshall
Pte. B.V. Cosgrove, 1st Pioneers
Lieut. G.C. Barbridge, R.C.D.
Pte. J.E.B. Ramsey, Sask. Hosp.
Pte. Walter Wood, 152nd
Pte. Fullerton
Pte. Sheldon Vass, 152nd
Pte. T. Stephenson, Killed in Act’n
Pte Jas. Ramsey, Kill in Act’n
Pte G.D. Joliffe, Kill in Act’n
Pte. S. Hicks, Wounded & dis
Pte. W.O. Shier, I.A. Trans
Pte. W.A. Armstrong, I.A. Trans
Lce-Cpl J.W. Kitching, 152nd
Cpl N.J. Buddy, 152nd
Pte. A.M. Seabrook, 53rd
Pte G.L. Wells, 152nd
Pte G.OL. Wells, 152nd
Pte S.S. Smyer, 152nd
Pte. H.W. Morgan, 152nd
Pte G.H. Critchlow, 152nd
Pte. W.M.C. Jackson
Sergt F.C. Mitchell, 152nd
Pte. L.E. Wells, 46th
Pte. Frank FAir, 46th
Pte. G.G. Davis, 152nd
Pte A.E. King, 152nd
Pte. Chas. H. Wood, 152nd
Pte.Hy Positon, 152nd
Sergt. W.P. Sparling, 212th
Pte. Munro Elliott, C.A.M.C.
Pte. E.H.J. Vincent. C.A.M.C.
Pte. W.B. Butchart, 79th
Pte. Alex Turnbull, 79th
Pte Thos. Ryckman, Area A
Pte Jas Duncan, 161st
Pte Austin Wright
Pte Thos Jones, 48th
Pte B. Horseman
Pte Wm. Gosnell, killed
Pte. Frank A. Bell, 79th fld Amb.
Ptd Maurice Anderson
Pte J.R.B. Baser, 221st
Pte N. Broberg, R.C.D.
Pte Albert Brawn, 152nd
Ptd Arthur Geary
Pte Knox
~Carnduff Gazette April 13, 1916
Note, faint newspaper type, at times hard to read.




Canada now recruiting at the rate of a thousand men daily. 125,000 men have already been sent overseas. Recruiting to continue until we have defeated Germany and Prussianism, and if necessary Canada will send a Million Men to save World’s Civilization.~ Carnduff Gazette. April 20,1916


TO YOU AT HOME

Each night we panted till the runners came,
Bearing your letters through the battle-smoke.
Their path lay up Death Valley spouting flame,
Across the ridge where the Hun’s anger spoke
In bursting shells and cataracts of pain;
Then down the road where no one goes by day,
And so into the tortured, pockmarked plain
Where dead men clasp their wounds and point the way.
Here gas lurks treacherously and the wire
Of old defences tangles up the feet;
Faces and hands strain upward through the mire,
Speaking the anguish of the Hun’s retreat.
Sometimes no letters came; the evening hate
Dragged on till dawn. The ridge in flying spray
Of hissing shrapnel told the runners’ fate;
We knew we should not hear from you that day—
From you, who from the trenches of the mind
Hurl back despair, smiling with sobbing breath,
Writing your souls on paper to be kind,
That you for us may take the sting from Death.

BIBLIOGRAPHY
Carnduff & District Historical Society. A Stake in the West. Carnduff and District. ISBN 0-88925-116-9. Carnduff, SK. Friesen Printers. Altona, MB.

Carnduff Gazette 1914, 1915, 1916 Provincial Archives of Saskatchewan » Islandora Repository » Saskatchewan Historic Newspapers Online » Saskatchewan Historic Newspapers Online » Carnduff, SK

Dawson, Coningsby. The Glory of the Trenches.

Royal Canadian Legion No 216 – 202 4th St W, Carnduff, SK Facebook Page

The Royal Canadian Legion Saskatchewan Command. Military Service Recognition Book.

Sep 072015
 

The Rural Municipality of Stanley 215 began as Local Improvement District No. 11-C-2 before becoming L.I.D. No. 215. The Rm office is situated on Third Avenue West in Melville, Saskatchewan. Birmingham, Colmer, Duff, Fenwood, Goodeve, Hirzel, Kelsonia, Pearl Park, Pheasant Forks, Plain View, Robert and Rosemount post offices were within the RM boundaries. The hamlets and villages established within the area were Birmingham, Colmer, Duff, Fenwood, Goodeve, and Westview.

The R.M. of Stanley No. 215 History Book Committee compiled a listing with photographs of those veterans who served in World War I and World War II. They are asking to be contacted if any names were missed inadvertently.

In World War II, Fred and Jack DOCKERILL were killed in action along with Adam GRYGAR, William KOSTYSHYN, Henry LUTZKO, Irvin MILLER. They also list William DANIELS, John FLAT, Gustuf POLISHAK as members of the armed forces who gave the supreme sacrifice, but photos of these were unavailable. They have the veterans listed also for World War I, but without any killed in action.

The Goodeve memorial rink erected a plaque – In memory of the men of this district who gave their lives in the great war 1939-1945. Wm DANIELS, Wm KOSTYSHEN, A GRYGAR, H. Lutzko, A. POLISHAK. Over the years 1949-1952 funds were raised, and the memorial rink constructed.

Bibliography

Treasured Memories Unfold. Rural Municipality of Stanley 215. R.M. of Stanley No. 215 History Book Committee. Box 29. Fenwood, SK. S0A 0Y0. Friesen Printers. Altona, MB. ISBN 0-88925-989-5. 1992,

Aug 272015
 

Netherhill – a village at north west quarter of section 11 township 29 range 21 west of the third meridian -offered more men to the Canadian Expeditionary Force (C.E.F.) than any other town of its size. Col D.J. MacDonald, George Gear, Wm. J. Bourne, Ira Creed, Harry Ryan, Art Reed, Wm. Schell, John Lloyd, R. Deakins, Alton Leach, C. Sedore, Wm. Young, John King, Andy King, Les Loney, Wm. Scholey, John McRae, R. Menzies, John Dunlop, D.S. Cobb, R.P. Kay, Wm. Huser, Walter Siebert, James Anderson and Wm. Owen. The local branch of the The Great War Veterans’ Association (G.W.V.A.) began operating from the Eagle Lake School house.

Thos. Haddock, C. Togeson, Sgt. Ntzell, Geo. Robinson, Norman Fry-the first soldier casualty of the Canadian army-, George Pennell, Geo. Wellbelove, and Len Dixon did not return from the front, paying the supreme sacrifice.(p. 391-393) George Craig also remembers that Ed Shea, George Herman, Tom Simpson, Arthur Currie lost their lives in the Second World War.(p. 398)

Norman Fry, an army bugler was one of the first Canadian Soldiers to fall in World War I. Fry was a bugler in the English army before he came to Canada. While working for D.J. McDonald, Norman could be heard playing “Reveille” – first call- and “Lights Out”. Corporal Norman Fry of the Princess Pats was killed nearly immediately when the Canadian troops met the Germans. (p. 383 and 398)

Bill Netzel and Leonard Dixon also gave the supreme sacrifice. Others remembered were Bill Bourne, Bill Netzel, Les Loney, Jack King and the McDonald brothers. Toyeson also served with D.J. McDonald with the Strathcona Ligtht Horse. Toyeson was “literally blown to pieces” and nothing was found of him. (p. 383)

William (Bill) John Bourne, settling near Netherhill enlisted in the Winnipeg Rifles – the Little Black Devils. Bourne served as a sniper, and was often accompanied with the company of Tom Longboat. Bourne was injured in the Battle of Hill 70, and was rescued by German prisoners. Returning home on the “Aquitania” a ship converted to a hospital ship, he made it to New York safely despite the ship being torpedoed. (p. 417-419)

The biography of James (Jim) Rogers written up by Mr. and Mrs. B Gunnlaugson and Mrs. C. Ham. for Division 4 from the book; Memoirs of Hillsburgh. Jim had homesteaded on he north east quarter of section 2 township 30 range 19 west of the third meridian near his Uncle Joe. He was taken by snipers in the first world war. (p.145)William and Chester Kurtz,

James Calder from Aberdeenshire, Scotland settled near Brock. He had enlisted in World War I with the N.C.M.R. (Ninth Canadian Mounted Rifles) and the Royal Canadian Dragoons. He recounted an experience aboard ship enroute from Canada when a hurricane arose. The ship went some 500 miles off course due to the rudder of the ship being taken by the storm. (p.199)

Daniel G. Thomas left England to set up homesteading near Brock before enlisting in the first World War serving with the 53rd Battalion in France. After he was wounded he was sent to England to Work in the Orthopedic Hospital as a shoemaker, his first profession in England.

James (Jim) Anderson from Thomesville, ONtario enlisted with the First Canadian Engineers. On his discharge he bought land through the soldier’s settlement board.(p. 319)

D.J. MacDonald served with the Saskatchewan Light Horse Regiment as an officer. In 1914 he left overseas as a lieutenant and the youngest colonel in the Canadian army at the age of 28. He was wounded twice, and later commanded military outfits in Canada. During World War II he was Inspector General for Central Canada until his retirement as Major General. He was awarded the D.S.O. with two bars, the Military Cross, Order of the British Empire, and Order of Orange Nassau. MacDonald’s brother Roddie served as trooper with the Lord Strathcona Horse.(p.364)

Charles (Chas.) S. Smith who settled near Brock signed up for the Great War. To help with the 1916 “bumper crop” several “soldier boys” were granted harvest leave to return home to help out. Charlie Marcroft, Jimmy Campbell, Art Cann, Bob Arnold, Jimmy Thompson, Percy Parks and others were among whose who came home on temporary leave. Smith worked with the Soldier’s Settlement Board after his tour of duty and took up a soldier’s settlement claim near Naicam in 1922. (p. 249)

In the Rural Municipality of Hillsburgh a number of settlers filed homesteads with South African scrip, such as Dexter (Dic) R. Heberlee, and Jamws Millan Cameron to name a few.

Memoirs of Hillsburgh Rural Municipality No. 289 local history book remembers those who fell during the two Great Wars:

World War I:

  • DIXON, Leonard
  • FLEMING, Norman
  • FRY, Norman
  • HADDOCK, Thos.
  • HALDERSON, Kenneth
  • HALL, Fred
  • INGELS, James
  • MARCROFT, Chas.
  • NETZELL, Wm. T.
  • PARKS, Ernest
  • PARKS, Bruce
  • PEACOCK, J.
  • PENNELL, Geo. M
  • RIGHTON, W.
  • ROBINSON, Geo
  • ROGERS, James
  • THOMAS, Percy
  • TORGESON, G.E.
  • WALKER, Percy
  • WEATHERSPOON, David
  • WELLBELOVE, Geo.
  • YATES, Reginald

World War II:

  • BOVAIR, D.
  • CAMPBELL, Donald J
  • COCHRAN, John
  • CURRIE, Arthur
  • FOREMAN, Robert L
  • HERMAN, Geo.
  • MORE, Phyllis E
  • ROGERS, V
  • SHEA, Edward
  • SIMPSON, Thos.
  • STONEHOUSE, L

Hillsburgh Rural Municipality 289 no longer exists, it officially disorganised December 31, 1965. Amalgation took place with the Kindersley Rural Municipality No. 290 in 1965, and the Rural Municipality of Elma No. 291 amalgamated in 1951.

BIBLIOGRAPHY:

Memoirs of Hillsburgh Rural Municipality No. 289 Hillsburgh History Committee. c1955.

Adamson, Julia. 1921 Canada Census: Place of Habitation :: Rural Municipalities Saskatchewan Gen Web E-Magazine.

Aug 052015
 

The town of Sintaluta is located about 85 km east of Regina on the Trans-Canada Highway.

The Veterans of both World War I and World War II came together to unveil the Sintaluta War Memorial Cross in August 1948, on Decoration Day. This area is served by the Canadian Legion British Empire Service League (B.E.S.L.) Sintaluta Branch and the Royal Canadian Legion #18 Sintaluta Branch.

Some of the names who have fallen from this area were:

SURNAME Given
Bently Clarence WWI
Bishop Fredrick
Blakley Roy WWI
Boden J.S. WWI
Bogie Charles WWI
Davies Owen WWII
Deane E.B. WWI
Dolter Leo WWI
Forsyth Charlie WWI
Goldsmith Harry WWI
Gotwaltz Captain E.C. WWI
Grey Malcolm WWI
Harper Harry WWI
Hill Laird Robert WWII
Hiscock L.E. WWI
Hodgins David WWI
Jack Alex WWII
Jackson Arthur WWII
Joslyn Harold WWI
Joslyn Robert WWI
Kellow Claud
Luther Norman WWII
McGalasson Joseph WWI
Meers E.S. WWI
Partridge Charlie WWI
Partridge Harold WWI
Reeve Russell WWI
Snelgrove Robert WWI
Wilbur Garfield WWI
Wilson William WWI
Woodhouse Jack (John) WWI

The local history book, Tales of the Red Fox. also lists the veterans who served, and further historical information and photographs for their roll of honour.

Bibliography:

Tales of the Red Fox. Assiniboine Reserve, Town of Sintaluta, Districts Allindale, Durham, Blackwood, Red Fox, And Spring Coulee Sintaluta and District History Book Committee. Box 1984 Sintaluta, SK, S0G 4N0. ISBN 0-88925-498-2. 1985. Friesen Printers, Altona, Mb. pages. 157-174


The Royal Canadian Legion Saskatchewan Command Sintaluta Branch of the Canadian Legion (pdf) Page 45 Date accessed August 5, 2015.



Memorials Details Search Results Sintaluta two brass plaques CMP Home > DHH Home > Military Memorials NICMM > Memorials Details Search Results National Defence and The Canadian Forces. 2008-04-16. Date accessed August 5, 2015.


Sintaluta, Saskatchewan Wikipedia. 27 July 2015, Date accessed August 5, 2015.


Sintaluta The Encyclopedia of Saskatchewan. Canadian Plains Research Center. University of Regina. 2006. Date accessed August 5, 2015.

Jun 302015
 

Clouston is located ten miles outside of Prince Albert to the south west. It is situated on section 13 township 27 range 47 west of the second meridian and was located on the Canadian National Railway line.

Harry Dennis gave the supreme sacrifice World War I September 1, 1918. He disembarked from Canada on May 19, 1915 after enlisting at Prince Albert. George Bannerman Senior, George Bennett, Benjamin Clark, H. Erasmus, Ian Hewison, Samuel McKay, and James Woodhouse were all listed as killed in action during the Great War.

In World War II, Harry Anderson was killed in action. Those who did not return from World War II, were Lloyd Adams, Harry Anderson, Louis Brunning, Cecil Fidler, Clarence Lorenson, Clifford Mackie, Norman Massey, Duncan McDonald, William Mitchell, Jack Nelson, James Tait and Irving Wesley.

George Bennett was the son of Alfred Ernest Bennett , and Mary Campbell. George was killed at Passchendale, November 11, 1917, His brothers Thomas and Henry both enlisted but arrived home. Altogether the family had eight children.

James Woodhouse (1895-1917) and his siblings left Wallsend, England arriving in Canada with the Barr Colonists. The first brother, Cuthbert stayed in Canada and filed for homesteads in the Lily Plain district. Two brothers, Edwin and Jim served in World War I. Jim fell in 1917.

Colin McKay, and his brother Larry McKay both served in World War one serving overseas. Colin received serious injuries and died overseas. These brothers were the sons of Thomas McKay and Catherine McBeth.1/

Louis Brunning, born December 27, 1923, was the son of John and Irene Brunning according to the family history written by Marjorie Byers (Brunning). The family had eleven children. Loretta joined the air force, Harold was with the Regina Rifles, and later the air force. Louis was taken on June 6, 1944.

Duncan McDonald, the son of James Alexander McDonald, and Mrs. Lillian McDonald, was born in 1919. Serving as an Air Gunner, he was killed in action of November 9, 1941 while engaged at Hamburg, Germany.

Clarence Lorenson, the son of Leis Lorenson and Mary Ethel Smith. Clarence was born in 1919, the second of six children.

William Mitchell was the son of David Pearne Mitchell, and Elizabeth Selina Mills. David Mitchell served with the British Army Reserve during World War I serving as Corporal, receiving an honourable discharge after injury from sniper fire. William David (Billy) was born April 9, 1921, serving as a gunnery bombadier and navigation instructor. He lost his life on a training mission May 24, 1944 in Dafoe, Saskatchewan. William’s brother, Jack also served in World War Two with the Regina Rifles before transfer to the South Saskatchewan Rifles. Serving overseas, he was wounded, and received an honourable discharge in 1945.

James Tate was the son of Eugene TAte and Maria Adams. They had a family of twelve children. James fell in 1945.

Source:
Echoes Of Our Heritage. Chapter:Veterans. ISBN 0-88925-523-7. Clouston History Book. R.R. 3 Box 6 Site 3 Prince Albert, SK. Friesen Printers. Alton, MB.

Jun 222015
 

The “Shellbrook Chronicle ” on August 26, 1919 ran an article regarding the memorial service held in HOLBEIN SCHOOL DISTRICT 641 one room schoolhouse regarding the servicemen who fell in World War I. Ptes. Leon Hoopfer, Andrew Hislop, Jack Pearce, Paul Skotte, Oscar Soberg were all remembered for their service overseas.

A tombstone was erected by Earl Spencer at the Churchyard at Church Brampton, United Kingdom. The inscription bears the words; “Pte. Leon Edwin Hoopfer, of Holbein, Saskatchewan, Canada, 46th Canadians, D Company, died 20th August 1918, aged 20 years – For Freedeom.” Hoopfer, passed at the Brampton V.A.D. hospital at the age of 20. The Rector of Brampton, R.Leach kept in touch with Leon’s mother, Mrs. R.J. Hoopfer, and let her know of the thoughtfulness of the residents in Brampton.

The Wild Rose and ARea History Book Committee included a veterans section in their book, Footprints of Our Pioneers, Briarlea, Crutwell, Holbein, Nixbet, Rozilee, and Wild Rose. Included are the names and photos of those who served from the Briarlea, Crutwell, Holbein, Nixbet, Rozilee, and Wild Rose areas.

Forest (Forrest) BATHROW, Leon HOOPFER, “Sandy Stuart” James Alexander STUART, Joe BROWN, Harold CHAPMAN, Andrew HISLOP, Augustine KEANE, John MCKAY, Murdock MCKAY, James MILNE, Harold PEARCE, Jack PEARCE, Paul SKOTTE, Oscar SOBERG, Rowest TWISS gave the supreme sacrifice in World War I. Glen Rose CAMPBELL, Keith HADLEY, Neville HADLEY, George HALLIDAY, F.D.J. (Jack) SMITH, Robert TAYLOR fell in World War II.

Forrest BATHROW was the son of Ezra Bathrow who had filed for homestead on the south east quarter of section 10 township 40 range 2 west of the third meridian.

Harold Wilfred Pearce who was born in Gloucestershire, England also fell in the Great War. A homesteader on South West quarter section 25, township 49 range 1 in 1914, Pearce enlisted becoming Sergeant of the 5th Overseas Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force, CEF. He was killed in action July 18, 1917.

James Alexander (sandy) STUART was born in Drumlithie, Scotland, according to Marg Muirhead. Sandy, his sister Nellie and her husband Archie WASON, Sandy’s parents, and a brother Fred followed Sandy’s sister Georgina who had arrived in Canada eight years earlier, and married Walter BROWN. Sandy settled in the Rozilee area of Saskatchewan when he arrived. Sandy signed up to serve in World War I at Winnipeg, Manitoba to serve as a private with the 179th Cameron Highlanders. Sandy was transferred to the 43rd when he arrived in France. On April 17, 1917, the family was told that Sandy was missing in action. The military later informed the family that Sandy was killed on Vimy Ridge.

In the newspaper report that told of J.A. STUART missing in action, the newspaper also reported that “E.J. Nelson, Sturgeon Valley, 188th Battalion, Frank Dreaver, Mistawasis, 188th Batt., Corporal Wilson, late of R.N.W.M. Police, Shellbrook, Coldstream Guards” (page 722) were killed.

Wilbert KEATING settled in the Rozilee district on the north west quarter of section 31 township 49 range 2 west of the third meridian and the south east quarter of section 6 township 50 range 2 west of the third meridian. He fell in World War I, and the family donated his 38-55 Winchester Rifle to the Prince Albert Museum.

Joe BROWN was also born in Drumlithie, Scotland. Joe, and his brother Walter arrive in the area around Rozilee. Joe began homesteading on the north east quarter of section 6 township 50 range 2 west of the third meridian. Joe served as Lance Corporal when he wrote home from France.

Robert TWISS filed on the north east quarter of section 4 township 50 range 1 west of the third meridian near Briarlea. It was right around the time that he filed for his homestead that he enlisted in the service, and not much is known locally about him. His sister received title to his land when he fell at Vimy Ridge during the war. Robert Dudley TWISS enlisted in Prince Albert in 1915, and served as Lieutenant with the 43rd Battalion, Manitoba Regiment.

Of the nine children born to Cecil and Pearl HADLEY, four served in the armed forces, and two were lost. <A href="http://svwm.ca/casualty-display/?ID=A000008075È"Captain Neville Hughes HADLEY'éa" served with the South Saskatchewan Regiment and fell August 28, 1944. Flying Officer Keith Bayfield HADLEY served with the Royal Canadian Air Force RCAF until April 25 1944 when was taken.

SOURCE:
Footprints of Our Pioneers, Briarlea, Crutwell, Holbein, Nizbet, Rozilee, and Wild Rose. 1990. ISBN 0-858925-917-8 Wild Rose and Area History Book Committee. Shellbrook, SK. Friesen Printers.

Aug 072014
 

World War One Remembered at the University of Saskatchewan

Honouring our heroes - Remember Us - University of Saskatchewan Great War Commemoration CommitteeHonourRollAddendum-Professor Dean McNeil trumpet solo-2
Honour Roll Addendum
Professor Dean McNeil Trumpet Solos
On Thursday August 7, 2014 the “Honouring our heroes” program commemorated those students, faculty and staff who fought in the First World War (1914-1918) in Convocation Hall, Peter MacKinnon Building on the University of Saskatchewan Campus. According to the University of Saskatchewan media advisory, Chancellor Emerita Vera Pezer, Interim President and Vice-Chancellor Gordon Barnhart, and history student Eric Story related that this is the first of many commemorative events planned in honour of the centennial year. World War I commenced August 4, 1914.
Pezer recounted that while World War I “produced unprecedented slaughter” of those “sent forth to the Great War”, the effects of the war had a “profound effect upon the province” as well as established a “growing sense of national pride.” “Beyond fighting there were many ways that the University” contributed to the war effort, such as chaplin Edmund Oliver who joined the Western Universities Battalion with the Canadian Expeditionary Force (CEF). Edmund helped to establish the University of Vimy Ridge and worked on the battle fields in France serving the sick, the wounded soldiers, and advising families when enlisted personnel gave the supreme sacrifice.

Honouring our heroes - Remember Us - University of Saskatchewan Great War Commemoration Committee veiled plaques honouring our heroes
Veiled Plaques Honouring our heroes
Honouring our heroes - Remember Us - University of Saskatchewan Great War Commemoration Committee r, Interim President and Vice-Chancellor Gordon Barnhart - history student Eric Story-Chancellor Emerita Vera Pezer
Interim President and Vice-Chancellor Gordon Barnhart, history student Eric Story, Chancellor Emerita Vera Pezer
Honouring our heroes - Remember Us - University of Saskatchewan Great War Commemoration Committee Chancellor Emerita Vera Pezer.
Chancellor Emerita Vera Pezer
Honouring our heroes - Remember Us - University of Saskatchewan Great War Commemoration Committee veiled plaques honouring our heroes Interim President and Vice-Chancellor Gordon Barnhart - history student Eric Story-Chancellor Emerita Vera Pezer
Interim President and Vice-Chancellor Gordon Barnhart, history student Eric Story, Chancellor Emerita Vera Pezer

 

Research conducted by Professor Emeritus of History, Michael Hayden, found those names missing during the original commemoration services held by the University of Saskatchewan. 349 men and one woman are named on the walls of the Peter McKinnon Building National Historic Site of Canada (the former College Building ). Memorial ribbons are inscribed with the names of 298 military personnel, noting additionally those who were wounded wounded, or killed in action. Accompanying the ribbons are 34 names mostly of the Royal Air Force. Another 23 names commemorate the volunteer nurses of the Emmanuel College Hospital who served during the 1918 Influenza Epidemic. The names of 18 service personnel were dedicated at this ceremony on a plaque unveiled August 7, 2014. This plaque will be mounted outside of Convocation Hall and in this way these eighteen heroes of World War I will be honoured prominently in the first building erected on the University of Saskatchewan grounds.

Honouring our heroes - Remember Us - University of Saskatchewan Great War Commemoration Committee slide show
Slide Show
Honouring our heroes - Remember Us - University of Saskatchewan Great War Commemoration Committee Eric Story History Student
Eric Story History Student University of Saskatchewan Great War Commemoration Committee
Honouring our heroes - Remember Us - University of Saskatchewan Great War Commemoration Committee Interview of MichaelHayden at Honouring our Heroes
Interview of MichaelHayden at Honouring our Heroes
Honouring our heroes - Remember Us - University of Saskatchewan Great War Commemoration Committee JGDiefenbakerMemorialRibbon
J.G. Diefenbaker Memorial Ribbon

 

Following speeches given by Pezer, Barnhart and Story, the names of those commemorated on the plaque were read out. The “Last Post” trumpet solo rang out by Professor Dean McNeil. A moment of silence followed and then the “Reveille” trumpet solo rung out paying especial tribute to those students, faculty and staff named upon the plaque.

Barnhart related a lesson taken on by history students where each pupil in the class was assigned a country. The assignment was to “trace through hour by hour and day by day the events leading up to … August 4, 1914, the beginning of the first world war one”. Such an indepth study brings home the politics one hundred years ago, that even though August 4 officially started the war, there were many contributing factors and forces in play which finally gave way to the imminence of war.

Honouring our heroes - Remember Us - University of Saskatchewan Great War Commemoration Committee Memorial Ribbons Admiration
Memorial Ribbons Admiration
Honouring our heroes - Remember Us - University of Saskatchewan Great War Commemoration Committee Petty Officer 1st Class Warren Noble CD Recruiter
University of Saskatchewan
Memorial Ribbons Plaque
Petty Officer 1st Class Warren Noble CD Recruiter
HMCS Unicorn
National Defence
Honouring our heroes - Remember Us - University of Saskatchewan Great War Commemoration Committee Honour Roll Addendum Professor Dean McNeil Trumpet Solos
Honour Roll Addendum ~ Professor Dean McNeil Trumpet Solos
Honouring our heroes - Remember Us - University of Saskatchewan Great War Commemoration Committee Petty Officer 1st Class Warren Noble CD Recruiter Sub Lieutenant Alicia Morris
Petty Officer 1st Class Warren Noble CD Recruiter
Sub Lieutenant Alicia Morris
HMCS Unicorn
National Defence

 

Though the University had only been open for seven years, Barnhart recounts that within three months of the First World War commencement, a recruitment program was in place. Seventy five per cent of the student body saw active service. Alongside students, staff and faculty served in the war effort. So many were absent from the College of Engineering, that it was forced to close during the 1916-7 academic year amid the Great War. Students were given one year’s credit towards their degree program which at the time they felt was a triumphant entitlement as the war was predicted to last short of one year. Faculty positions were held for all those who had enlisted.

During the renovations of the Peter McKinnon building a special insulation was installed over the memorial ribbons which was then encased in plywood casings to preserve the historic carvings. In this way no paint, no hammer nor any construction event could damage the commemorative ribbons.

“War changed Canada,” Barnhart affirmed, “in many ways Canada was no longer a colony”. Canada may have entered the Great War as a colony, however emerged as a country in its own right signing the armistice alongside the Allies of World War I on November 11, 1918.

Honouring our heroes - Remember Us - University of Saskatchewan Great War Commemoration Committee Memorial GSwift-JDCumming-HJBlair-MemorialRibbons
G Swift-J D Cumming-H J Blair-Memorial Ribbons

Story spoke on behalf of the University of Saskatchewan’s Great War Commemoration Committee which is chaired by Professor Emeritus Bill Waiser. This ceremony, the “Remember Us – Honouring our heroes” unveiling ceremony is the inaugural event sponsored by the Great War Commemoration Committee, there will be many more memorial events upcoming in the next four years.

Joseph Boyden has been scheduled to give a talk about two aboriginal snipers of World War I whom he wrote about in the much acclaimed novel, “Three Day Road”. There is in the making the “Great War Soiree” which will feature a theatrical number, and a musical score in tribute to the First World War.

In the works, is a public talk by Brain Gable, University of Saskatchewan alumnus, and award winning cartoonist for the Globe and Mail. Gable depicts editorial or political cartoons, containing commentaries and illustrations relating to the effects that the Great War had on society during the contemporary news releases of the Great War Centenary. His cartoons provide insight into issues and historical context of World War I embracing sensitivity, seriousness and satire on the outcome of events with a point of view 100 years later.

Honouring our heroes - Remember Us - University of Saskatchewan Great War Commemoration Committee College Building Plaque
College Building Plaque
Honouring our heroes - Remember Us - University of Saskatchewan Great War Commemoration Committee Memorial Peter McKinnon Building National Historic Site College Building
Peter McKinnon-(College Building) National Historic Site
Honouring our heroes - Remember Us - University of Saskatchewan Great War Commemoration Committee Peter McKinnon Building -College Building Plaque.
Peter McKinnon Building -College Building Plaque

 

Proposals yet to come from the Great War Commemoration Committee may feature the following. In 2016, a feature based upon the “The Antiques Road Show” will take place showcasing memorabilia, artefacts and antiques from the Great War. A culinary week is in progress studying the recipes and foods sustaining the appetites during the First World War years. Finally in 2018, the University of Saskatchewan Archives website will be completed and expanded with an grand ceremony unveiling featured topics such as “How to research”, blogs and articles on the Great War.

While Story suggests these as tantalizing morsels of events yet to come over the next four years, this is by no means an exhaustive list. To follow more about plans undertaken by the Great War Commemoration Committee please see their facebook page and twitter page online.

World War I ~ “The war to end all wars”~ how is it remembered? The Great War Commemoration Committee tackles the issues, the evolution, and culture of the war years, and its impact on the University and its role in the greater community of the city of Saskatoon, the province of Saskatchewan the nation of Canada on the world stage. The evolution of the University was inevitable and dramatic during the war years contrasting sharply with the life of contemporary students, faculty and staff. The University of Saskatchewan’s motto Deo et Patriæ (Latin) translates to For God and Country.‘Deo et Patriae’ has been the guiding slogan of the university since its foundation, and the strength and fervor of that slogan were amply demonstrated during the dark years of the War, when students and professors marched shoulder to shoulder in the grim chaos of Flanders.”
Saskatoon Star Phoenix [Saskatoon Daily Star] July 15, 1926.

UNIVERSITY OF SASKATCHEWAN HONOUR ROLL ADDENDUM
Andrew Melville Anderson
Albert F. Bailey
Louis Brehaut 28th Bn.
John Rich Bunn Can. Army Med. Corps.
Harry Ray Contelon 1st Univ. Co., PPCLI,D
William Kenneth Forbes
J.W. French R.A.F.
General Middleton Grant 1st Depot Bn.
David Robert Green 1st Depot Bn., R.F.C.
William James Hall
William Cameron MacIntosh 28th Bn., 65th Overseas BN.
Kenneth McKenzie 196th Bn.
Vernon Ulysses Miner
Andrew Ernest Stewart
Robert Stewart 65th Bn, 72nd Bn, Wounded.
George Moir Weir
John McIntyre White Y.M.C.A. 46th Bn
Paul Peter Wiklund 44th Bn., Killed

 

BIBLIOGRAPHY:

Adamson, Julia. Archives ~Resources National, Provincial, City, and University archives. Saskatchewan Gen Web. April 10, 2014. Date accessed August 7,2014.

Adamson, Julia. Libraries Resources Saskatchewan Gen Web. April 10, 2014. Date accessed August 7,2014.

Adamson, Julia. War and Military resources Saskatchewan Gen Web. April 10, 2014. Date accessed August 7,2014.

Adamson, Julia Millions of Archival Newspaper Pages set to go online Saskatchewan Gen Web E~Magazine May 27, 2014. Date accessed August 7,2014.

Adamson, Julia. Michelle Lang. Canadian Journalist. Jan. 31, 1975-Dec 30, 2009. Afghanistan Casualty. Saskatchewan Gen Web E~Magazine November 11, 2012. Date accessed August 7,2014.

Adamson, Julia. Naval Monument honours Royal Canadian Navy prairie seamen and RCN ships. H.M.C.S. Regina (K234) and H.M.C.S. Weyburn (K 173) Saskatchewan Gen Web E~Magazine September 25, 2013. Date accessed August 7,2014.

Adamson, Julia. Montgomery Place Est. in 1946 by Our War Veterans. Saskatchewan Gen Web E~Magazine. October 9, 2013. Date accessed August 7,2014.

Adamson Julia. H.W. Balfour’s Truly Impressive Career. Recognized for Outstanding Civic Service and Meritorious Military Achievement. Saskatchewan Gen Web E~Magazine April 7, 2013 Date accessed August 7,2014.

Barnhart, Gordon. Oliver, Edmund H. (1882–1935) Encyclopedia of Saskatchewan. Canadian Plains Research Center. University of Regina. 2006. Date accessed August 7,2014.

Biber, Francois. Saskatoon Great War Memorial last of its kind in Canada. What began in 1923 remaing and has grown to more than 1,200 memorials CJME news. August 6, 2014. Date accessed August 7, 2014.

Brian Gable. Wikipedia the free encyclopedia. July 30, 2013. Date accessed August 7, 2014.

Brian Gable Editorial Cartoonist Bio. The Globe and Mail. June 3, 2009. Date accessed August 7, 2014.

Brian Gable on Facebook Date accessed August 7, 2014.

Coggins, Jack. A Chaplain’s War. Edmund Henry Oliver and the University of Vimy Ridge, 1916-1919 (pdf) Univeristy of Saskatchewan Library Archives. History Department Essays 2004. Date accessed August 7,2014.

Dawson, Anna-Lilja. The U of S held strong through the World Wars. The Sheaf. November 7, 2013. Date accessed August 7, 2014.

England declares war on Germany The Guardian. August 5, 1914. Date accessed August 7, 2014.

Eric Story on Facebook Eric Story (The_RealEAS) on Twitter Date accessed August 7,2014.

Ferguson, Mark. The University of Saskatchewan will rename the historic College Building to the Peter MacKinnon Building to honour the outgoing U of S President. University of Saskatchewan News. June 14, 2012. Date accessed August 7,2014.

Gable, Brian 1949- Something about the author, Scholarly Magazines, Encyclopedia.com. January 2009. Date accessed August 7,2014.

Globe and Mail on Twitter (#globeandmail) ‘The war to end all wars’: Today’s editorial cartoon by Brian Gable. Date accessed August 7,2014.

Great War Commemoration Committee on Facebook. Date accessed August 7,2014.

Great War Commomoration Committee on Twitter (#GWCP306) Date accessed August 7,2014.

Halliwell, J. Joseph Boyden. The Agenda with Steve Paikin. Video. Joseph Boyden: First Nations and the First World War July 31, 2014. Author Joseph Boyden discusses the important role Aboriginals played in the First World War, and the real-life Ojibwe soldier that inspired his novel “Three Day Road.”2014. The Ontario Educational Communications Authority (TVO) Date accessed August 7,2014.

Harvey, Alban.
Joseph Boyden The Canadian Encyclopedia. Aboriginal Peoples. March 6, 2014. Date accessed August 7,2014.

Hayden, Michael. Why Are All Those Names on the Wall? The University of Saskatchewan and World War I. Saskatchewan History 58, no. 2 (2006): 4.14.

Higher Education. The University of Saskatchewan: The Start Saskatchewan News Index. Top News Stories. University of Saskatchewan Library. Date accessed August 7, 2014.

Joseph Boyden. Wikipedia The free encyclopedia. March 7, 2014. Date accessed August 7, 2014.

Lacey, Dana. Documents show Harper;s extreme political control The Canadian Journalism Project. June 8, 2010. Date accessed August 7, 2014.

Long-lost names added to U of S War Memorial. 18 names will be added to the Roll of Honor. August 6, 2014. Date accessed August 7, 2014.

Mattern, Ashleigh. Alumnus Profile: Brian Gable, editorial cartoonist for the Globe and Mail. Centennial Committee. April 16, 2012. The Sheaf, One Hundred Years.Date accessed August 7, 2014.

Nurse, Donna Bailey. Joseph Boyden Author Profile. Way of the Warrior. Joseph Boyden brings new voice to First World War epic. Quill and Quire, Canada’s magazine of Book News and Reviews. Date accessed August 7, 2014.

Pitsula, James M. Manly Heroes: The University of Saskatchewan and the First World War. In Paul Stortz and E. Lisa Panayotidis, eds., Cultures, Communities, and Conflict: Histories of Canadian Universities and War. University of Toronto Press, 2012.

Preston, Richard. First World War centenary: how the events of August 1, 1914 unfolded. Telegraph. August 1, 2014. Date accessed August 7, 2014

Preston, Richard. First World War centenary: how the events of August 2, 1914 unfolded. Telegraph. August 2, 2014. Date accessed August 7, 2014

Preston, Richard. First World War centenary: how the events of August 3, 1914 unfolded. Telegraph. August 3, 2014. Date accessed August 7, 2014

Preston, Richard. First World War centenary: how the events of August 4, 1914 unfolded. Telegraph. August 4, 2014. Date accessed August 7, 2014

Remember Us Great War Commemoration project begins with plaque unveiling. Facebook.
Remember Us. University of Saskatchewan Great War Commemoration Project begins with plaque unveiling University of Saskatchewan News. Date accessed August 7, 2014.

Sibbald, Kirk. Cartoons and Calculus. Green and White. FAll 2010. Features. University of Saskatchewan. Date accessed August 7, 2014.

Stoon Great War on twitter (#StoonGreatWar) Date accessed August 7, 2014.

Story, Eric. Saskatchewan History online. Date accessed August 7, 2014.

Streck, Aaron. Eighteen alumni names complete U of S commemoration from WWI Global News. Shaw Media Inc. August 7, 2014. Date accessed August 7, 2014.

University remembers those who served in First World War. CTV news. August 7, 2014. Date accessed August 7, 2014.

University of Saskatchewan Great War on Twitter (#usaskGW) Date accessed August 7, 2014.

University of Saskatchewan honours students, faculty and staff who fought in WWI August 7, 2014. University of SAskatchewan News. August 7, 2014. Date accessed August 7, 2014.

Three Day Road [This novel written by Joseph Boyden follows the journey of two young Cree men, Xavier and Elijah, who volunteer for that war and become snipers during World War I] Wikipedia the free encyclopedia. August 2, 2014. Date accessed August 7, 2014.

Waiser, Bill. Opinion: Let’s protect future census data. Edmonton Journal Reprinted by the Ottawa Citizen. May 26, 2014. Date accessed August 7, 2014.

World War I Campus History. University of Saskatchewan. University Library. University Archives and Special Collections. Date accessed August 7, 2014.

Database at World War I:

  • Killed, died or wounded
  • U of S affiliation at enlistment
  • Batallion/unit at enlistment
  • Batallion/unit – all assignments
  • U of S College
  • Date of death
  • Decoration type
  • Rank

World War one Centenary on Twitter. (#wwicentenary) Date accessed August 7, 2014.
Stewart, Les. Why won’t this federal government support our invisibly wounded soldiers? Cartoon from the Globe and Mail by Brian Gable, re posted by the Springwater Park Citizen’s Coalition, a sustainbale business plan for Springwater Provincial Park in Midhurst, Ontario. December 20, 2013. Date accessed August 7, 2014.

WWI Canada Centennial Commemoration on facebook Date accessed August 7, 2014.

May 272014
 

Paddockwood Roll of Honour

Paddockwood is a village in Saskatchewan, Canada located 48.52 kilometers (30.15 miles) north of Prince Albert at Lat (DMS) 53° 31′ 00″ N Long (DMS) 105° 34′ 00″ W Dominion Land Survey Section 25, Township 52, Range 25, West of the 2nd meridian.

It is interesting to note that “the Paddockwood District was settled by many First World War Veterans taking up homesteads and developing the community, through the Soldier Settlement Board.”*

The Royal Canadian Legion Branch 31 -Paddockwood was formed in 1926 replacing the Great War Veterans Association which served veterans and spouses. The Royal Canadian Legion Ladies’ Auxillary Branch Number 31 was formed in 1927.

F. Pitts, J. Mowbray, D. Daisley, G. Brown, and W. Beethem were lost in World War I. J.A. Beck, E. Backman, L. Craig, A. Chyney, H. Judd, E. Land, D. McConnechy, W. McIntyre, M. Rankin, M. Sorenson, J. Thompson, J. Weedon, and J. White gave the supreme sacrifice in World War II.

Cordwood and Courage 1911-1982 Paddockwood, Beaton, Chesley, Chiefswood, Dorothy I-II, Elk Holme, Elkrange, Birchbark, Howard Creek, Melba, Moose Lake, Pine Valley, Surrey local history book written by the Paddockwood and District History Book Committee 1982 lists the names of those who served in both Great Wars, as well, as those who served post war, and in the Korean War.

John Dinius serving with the Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry Third Battalion served in the Korean War. According to the Prince Albert Herald, Dinius noted “If you’re telling stories you’re making it look like there’s something good about it or exciting about it, but when you’re in it, it’s just a dirty rotten job — that’s all it is”

The Herald reported that 516 Canadians died overseas during the Korean War. Saskatchewan Virtual War Memorial notes that 39 of these were from Saskatchewan.

The Royal Canadian Legion 31 from Paddockwood made a donation towards the establishment of the Juno Beach Centre in Normandy, France. 2014 marks the 70th anniversary of D-Day, June 6, 1944 and commemorative events are being held June 2014 in both Canada and France.

“I am a Canadian, free to speak without fear, free to worship in my own way, free to stand for what I think right, free to oppose what I believe wrong, or free to choose those who shall govern my country. This heritage of freedom I pledge to uphold for myself and all mankind.”~John Diefenbaker

The Paddockwood Royal Canadian Legion Branch 31 mentions that their motto is “To Serve Our Veterans and Our Country” as reported in the Command History Book along with the history of the Royal Canadian Legion Branches in Saskatchewan.

Author Julia Adamson

Bibliography:

Paddockwood and District History Book Committee 1982. Cordwood and Courage 1911-1982 Paddockwood, Beaton, Chesley, Chiefswood, Dorothy I-II, Elk Holme, Elkrange, Birchbark, Howard Creek, Melba, Moose Lake, Pine Valley, Surrey ISBN 0-88925-407-9, Friesen Printers Altona, MB. 1982.

Clarke, Tyler. Korean Peace Treaty hits 60 years -Image:Paddockwood area veteran John Dinius is seen during the Korean War with two Korean Augmentation Troops Commonwealth Division solders. April 05, 2013

* The Royal Canadian Legion Saskatchewan Command Commemorative History Book 1926-2006 A collection of Memories, Activities and Community Commitment from our Branches and Members throughout the Province! Page 55 (pdf)

Presentation and hanging of the post World War Two Honor Roll. Paddockwood Legion Branch #31
from Royal Canadian Legion album
Together We Served.com

Juno Beach Centre Contributing Legions. 2014.