Jul 272014
 

Prairie Echoes A History of Aspenshaw, Nolin (Hamlin), McMillan School Districts. has published a roll of honour memorializing all of the veterans who served in the military from the area north of North Battleford, Saskatchewan.

Hamlin is currently listed as an unincorporated area 11.42 kilometres (7.09 miles) north of North Battleford.  Hamlin locates at section 18- township 45- range 16-West of the 3rd meridian or Latitude – Longitude :     52º 52′ N, 108º 19′ W just to the west of Saskatchewan Highway 4.  North Battleford is located at south west section 8 township 44 range 16 west of the third meridian at Latitude – Longitude :     52º 45′ 27” N, 108º 17′ 10” W at the intersections of Saskatchewan Highways 4, 16 and 40.

From the local history book listing, those who gave the supreme sacrifice are listed here. Those taken in World War One were Richard D. Ellis, Charles Fletcher Hicks, and John A. McMillan. Killed in service during World War II was Harry Hoganson.

A write up is provided in the North Battleford “Remembrance Day” paper of 1974 about John Archibald McMillan (1838-1918) who served with the 5th Battalion Canadian-British Expeditionary Force. In the Saskatoon Star Phoenix Friday May 5, 1944 edition is a tribute to Corporal Harry L. Hoganson and family. The poem “Somewhere in France” was published by the Hamlin Community History Book Committee in the book, Prairie Echoes A HIstory of Aspenshaw, Nolin (Hamlin), McMillan School Districts.

Per ardua ad astra
Royal Air Force RAF Motto
“Through adversity to the stars”
“Through struggle to the stars”

Fred Walker contributed a report about the Hamlin Airport, a relief landing field for the North Battleford No. 35 British Commonwealth Air Training School. One or two relief airfields were located within 10–15 km of every principal airfield. The No. 1 Relief Airfield was denoted as “R1″ in RCAF Station diaries. The school also utilized another auxiliary landing strip at Brada airport. The field at Hamlin on section 17 township 45 range 16 west of the third meridian was operational by the school between September 4, 1941 to February 25, 1944. Walker continued to recount the history of the “McIntosh Field” North Battleford (Cameron McIntosh) airport. The Commonwealth Training Program would be established here during World War II. Following the dissolution of No. 35 Service Flying Training School, the St. Hubert Quebec No. 13 SFTS made use of the fields and aerodrome until the spring of 1945.

On October 8, 1944 a Royal Air Force Memorial Window was dedicated by the Bishop of Saskatoon at St. Paul’s Anglican Church in North Battleford. The names of the RAF personnel who gave the supreme sacrifice during World War II at the Air Force Training Base are listed in the article by Bruce Forsyth, No. 35 SFTS & No. 13 SFTS, North Battleford

Alongside the write up about the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan (BCATP) in the book, Prairie Echoes A History of Aspenshaw, Nolin (Hamlin), McMillan School Districts., is a roll of honour dedicated to the known air crews who lost their lives while training. LAC T.D. Bower; Sgt. J.L. Clarke; LAC F.C. Cannings; LAC N. Cheethan; Sgt. F. Cunningham; Sgt. J.D. Douglas; LAC B.T. Evans; Sgt. L.G. Firmage; LAC. O. Firmin; CPl B.J. Ford-Smith; F.O. A.A. Gree; LAC P.J. Haley; Cpl. J. Hayes; P.O. R. Herries; P.O. D.H. Hodgkinson; Sgt. L.S. Hodgkins; Sgt. K. Holt; LAC J. Hutchinson, A C2 W.J. Keenan; F.O. A.J.R. Knights; Cpl. T.E.E. Leahy; LAC. G.E. Lyons; Cpl. F.A. Mitchell; Sgt. N.I. Mellor; Muriel Almyra North; Sgt. F.J.B. Rawlings; LA2 J.J. Riley; LAC T. Robinson; LAC E.J. Thomas; AC2 E.F. Thompson; F.O. J. Tomalin; LAC R. Wangh; LAC B.D. Wickham.


“Never in the field of human conflict was so much owed by so many to so few.”

― Winston Churchill

 

Article by Julia Adamson

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