Oct 282017
 

The Honour Roll Committee put together a listing of veterans of those who served the community. The Blended Heritage History Committee compiled the local history book: Blended heritage which is now re-published with permissions on line at Our Roots Nos Racines.

Included here are those who gave the supreme sacrifice in service to their country as noted;

  • William Baynton World War One
  • Angus Bell.
  • Torindo Bisaro
  • Lorne Elliot World War One
  • Joe Giebault
  • Sgt. Don Havard
  • Wilbert McCallum
  • Lieut. Fred Mullins Scottish Regiment
  • Charlie Niven
  • Reuben W. Orr R.C.A.F.
  • Marc Paradis
  • Ernest Paron
  • Charlie Prongua
  • Leonard Riggs
  • Percy Rogers World War One
  • Glen Stewart
  • ? Seigel
  • George Wood World War One

In the grey twilight of the autumn eves,
It sighed as it sang through the dying leaves:
“Ye think with regret that the world was bright,
That your path was short and your task was light;
The path, though short, was perhaps the best
And the toil was sweet, that it led to rest.”
John McCrae

Oct 282017
 

Sovereign is a village east of Rosetown on the north east quarter of section 26 township 29 range 13 west of the third meridian. The Sovereign Historical Group remembered those fallen in the Great War, the war to end all wars in their local history book entitled: Mileposts to memories Sovereign, Saskatchewan published 1981.  Additionally, veterans were recorded in the book from the two great wars

“Bid them be patient, and some day, anon,

They shall feel earth enwrapt in silence deep;

Shall greet, in wonderment, the quiet dawn,

And in content may turn them to their sleep. ~John McCrae”

      World War One 1914- 1918 Honour Roll

 

      Killed in Action

    • J.S.W. Ironsides
    • D.W. Goodwin
    • Arthur McDonald
    • Leonard Adams
    • W.E. Bigwood

Missing in Action

  • G.F. Melrose
Oct 282017
 

The names of those fallen during the Great Wars are commemorated on the Radisson Cemetery memorial gates, and dutifully recorded in the local history book, Reflections of Radisson : 1902-1982. by the Radisson and District Historical Society Radisson, Saskatchewan 1982. They are remembered in prose by R.G. (Bob) Mason who wrote ‘The Patriot’ an excerpt follows “…He loved Saskatchewan, and on that day, His country called we watched him go away…”

The town of Radisson locates just north west of Saskatoon on North West section 21 township 40 range 10 west of the third meridian.

Additionally, those who served overseas are remembered in Reflections of Radisson : 1902-1982 published online by Our Roots Nos Racines.

    World War One Honour Roll

  • O. Andrews
  • F. Bassett
  • H.N. Bingham
  • T. Cheeny
  • Fred Dinnie
  • Fred Giles
  • G.R. Hales
  • Fred Mason
  • A.D. Pole
  • W. Robichard
  • Francis Watson
    World War II Honour Roll

  • Stuart Clark
  • Bill Derksen
  • Wendell Drew
  • Harvey Hunter
  • Tom Ibbotson
  • Arthur Springer
Jul 222017
 
Frank  Sekulich

Frank Sekulich

Frank Joseph Sekulich

 

 

By:  Pat MacFarlane

 

 

Frank Joseph Sekulich

Born:  March 3, 1918

Died:  April 4, 1945

 

At the mention of his name, my father’s eyes (Mark Sekulich) would fill with tears and he would leave the room.  Faye (Gibney) Benson recalls watching November 11th Service from Ottawa with Grandma.  Grandma cried so hard that Faye thought Grandma should go to Ottawa to lay a wreath.  But they never talked about him in front of us.  He went to war and never returned, it was in the past, if you didn’t talk about it you didn’t hurt.  That was the Croatian way.

 

I have been told he was a happy-go-lucky man, but a bit short on temper.  The other brothers knew if they got into a bind Frank would wade in and help them out.  Rumor has it he liked to scap and took down more than 1 local fellow.

 

In the early years the country schools were used for dances.  There were many schools and 2-3 dances a week.  Frank went as much as possible.  But he was up early the next morning telling everyone “Get up!  People die in bed you know.”

 

Frank received a Grade 8 education at Hilledge and worked on the farm.  He spent some time in Sudbury with family.  He then went to B.C. where he worked as a fire fighter.

 

When the war broke out in 1939 he was 21.  He attempted to enlist but was refused for reasons unknown.

 

In 1943 he tried again and was accepted.  He formally enlisted on March 11, 1943 at Powell River, B.C. as Frank Nicholas Sekulich.  He listed his trade as farmer, mill worker.

 

He did basic training in Vernon, B.C., Winnipeg, Man., Wetaskiwin, Alberta, Camp Shilo, Manitoba and Woodstock, Ontario.

 

On February 19, 1944 he was engaged to Lorraine McNeil while on furlough.

 

On August 16, 1944 he failed to return from leave.  He was A.W.L. for 1 day and 12 hours.  He was admonished for the offense, on open arrest and forfeited 2 days pay.  I hope he had a good time for he shipped out to England August 31, 1944.

 

He was a member of Regina Rifles Regiment.  They went to France on September 29, 1944.  On February 13, 1945 he was promoted to Lt. Corporal.  The regiment ended up in Holland.  Another man from Kenaston, Bill Hobel was in the same regiment and was right beside him when he was killed by sniper fire April 5, 1945.  Bill told Grandma he died instantly which was a source of comfort to her, knowing he didn’t suffer.

 

Frank is buried in Holten Canadian War Cemetery, in Holland, with 1,342 other Canadians.

 

As an item of interest, Canada played a major role in the liberation of Holland.  Part of today’s school curriculum involves care and maintenance of these cemeteries.  Each child is assigned a specific grave to visit and plant flowers.  This was told to me by Gerarda Kaye, R.N., my co-worker who grew up in Holland.

 

In the Memorial Chamber at the base of Parliaments Peace Tower in Ottawa, Canada’s Books of Remembrance are displayed.  The books are under glass and list in alphabetical order the names of the war dead.  Each day at 11 am a page is turned in each book so that every name can at some time be read.  A grateful nation recognizes his sacrifice every year on November 24th when page 562 is displayed.

 

I feel I know him now.  He was 5’8” by his military records, handsome by his photos, a bit vain, charismatic, feisty and family oriented by all accounts.

 

I can’t help but wonder how different our family would have been had he come home.  Another Aunt and Uncle and more cousins to swell over ranks.  I often wonder how he would have made a living, where he would have lived and how his life would have affected us.

 

Submission by the niece of Frank Sekulich, Bev George.  Thank you kindly, Julia Adamson

Lance Corporal Frank Sekulich

Birth: Mar. 3, 1918
Kenaston, Saskatchewan, Canada
Death: Apr. 5, 1945, Netherlands

Parents:
Mathew Sekulich (1880 – 1953)
Eva Tomlenovich Sekulich (1885 – 1974)

Regina Rifle Regiment R.C.I.C.

Burial:
Holten Canadian War Cemetery
Holten
Rijssen-Holten Municipality
Overijssel, Netherlands
Plot: II. E. 6.
BIBLIOGRAPHY
Canadian Virtual War Memorial Frank Sekulich

Frank Sekulich article by Jan Braakman (Dutch investigative journalist and author) translated into English by Google

The original article by Jan Braakman is written in Dutch.

Frank Sekulich Biography ~ Powell River’s Unsung Heros Of World War II –dedicated to the 62 Servicemen who had ties to the Powell River, British Columbia, Canada area, who made the supreme sacrifice in  World War II.  Sekulich bio is near the bottom of the Powell River webpage.

Kenaston Cenotaph. Veteran’s Centennial Park and Cenotaph,
Kenaston, Saskatchewan.

An article has been written about Frank Sekulich by Noudi Spönhoff for a Dutch magazine. The article reflected on Frank Sekulich who lost his life as a soldier when he bravely fought the Germans near the village of Almen, where the Canadians recaptured the ‘Ehzer bridge’. This bridge though often called a Canadian troops a Bailey bridge (Victoria Bridge) is actually a callender-Hamilton Bridge. As the Germans destroyed many bridges during the war, those which remain have intrinsic heritage value. As this one survived the war, it has been re-furbished.

 

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Nov 262016
 

For King and County
Members of
Carnduff Community
Who have volunteered for Active Service
with
Canada’s Fighting Forces.

On pages 198, 199 and 200 of the local history book, A Stake in the West,, the Carnduff and district history committe came together to record local residents who served in the military forces. The listing includes veterans and those who gave the supreme sacrifice. Recorded here, are just those who fell in the Great War (1914-1918), and the honour roll for World War II (1939-1945) killed in action. Albert SARGENT, served with the King’s Own Yorkshire Infantry, Albert, having been born in England, immigrated in 1915, and following employment at Carnduff, was called to serve in the Great War, enlisting and engaging in the theatre of war overseas. On August 24, 1915, he paid the supreme sacrifice. Charles SARGENT, was one of three children born to David S. Sargent. Charles and his brother, D. Roy, both enlisted in World War I and served in the 232nd Battalion. Charley serving as a sergeant, and Roy as Lieutenant. In 1918, Charles, fell at Arras, France, Roy returned to Canada, and remained in military service. Andrew Grey COWIE Jr. ENLISTED jUNE 1916, IN THE 152nd Battalion. Andrew (Grey) was born July 28, 1893 in Ontario, and in 1905 came with his family to the Oakley school district of Saskatchewan where his father Andrew Grey COWIE filed a homestead. While overseas, Andrew Grey COWIE Jr. was transfered to the 32nd Battalion in 1916, and from there, he was moved to the 5th Battalion. Grey, became Lance-Sergeant April 17, and August 3, 1917, tragically suffered fatal wounds, and is buried in France. Grey received the British War Medal, and the Victory Medal. In 1940, Wesley BAILEY went and joined the Air Force for World War II. As a Flight Sergeant, Wesley, spent time overseas, and tragically, his plane was gunned down over Germany, and he was killed in action September 30, 1943. His brother, Fred BAILEY, also joined the Armed Forces and served between summer of 1941 to the summer of 1944, also in the Air Force, Fred, suffered an injury, and returned home to recuperate. By engaging in the pages of A Stake in the West, and the submitted family histories, brief biographies may be forthcoming about the following soldiers. Lest we Forget.

World War I:
ARCHER, Sid.
BAYLISS, F.
BAILEY, Gerald W.
COWIE, Grey
COSGROVE, B.V.
ELLIOT, Jas.
FAIR, Frank
JACKSON, W.M.C.
JOLIFFE, G.C.
LEE, Roy
LEWIS, A.S.
MILLIONS, C.C.
PACK. D.F.
PALMER, Wm
PATON, Lawrence
RAMSEY, Jas
RENDER, M.
RYCKMAN, Thos.
SARGENT, Albert
SARGENT, Charles
SPARLING, H.C.
STEPHENSON, T.
TURNBULL, Alex.
WILLIS, M.

World War II.
COZIER, Lloyd D.
FORSYTH, John H.
HULL, Wilbert
NORTON, Trueman E.
RAMSEY, Donald R.
TAYLOR, William
THOMPSON, Clifford
VASS, Daniel P.
WHITE, William H.

Keep the Home Fires Burning.
The following are the men (so far as we can learn) who have joined the colours from this town and district. We shall be glad to add other names if friends will post us.
Capt. W.T. Lockhart, C.A.M.C.
Capt. L.A. Smith, 152nd
Lieut. A.S. Lewis, Welsh Res.
Lieut. D.R. Sargent, 152nd
Segt. V.B. Preston, R.C.D.
Lce-Cpl. A.V. Burnell, R.C.D.
Lcr-Cpl. R. C. Burnell, R.C.D.
Trpr G.L. Taylor, R.C.D.
Pte. L. Hargrave.
Trpr G.M. Southcomb, R.C.D.
Trpr John Davidson, R.C.D.
Pte. R. Stawell.
Pte. W.D. Matheson
Pte. H.J. Robertson,
Pte. R. Lowney
Pte. H.C. Sparling, 1st D.A.P.,
Pte. Sid Archer, British Res.
Trpr Thos. Boyce
Trpt Jas. Critchlow.
Trpr Robert Horseman
Trpr William Jones
Trpr Mark Simpson
Trpr. E. Mathews
Trpr A.J. Farr, 10th C.M.R.
Pte. Fred Lane
Pte Ewart Wright, 78th
Pte. R.A. Branson
Pte. C.M. Husband
Pte. G.R. Ramsey, 48th
Pte. H.C. Wake, 48th
Pte. John Burke
Pte. Fred Kyle, Maeb Trans.
Pte. Frank Marshall
Pte. B.V. Cosgrove, 1st Pioneers
Lieut. G.C. Barbridge, R.C.D.
Pte. J.E.B. Ramsey, Sask. Hosp.
Pte. Walter Wood, 152nd
Pte. Fullerton
Pte. Sheldon Vass, 152nd
Pte. T. Stephenson, Killed in Act’n
Pte Jas. Ramsey, Kill in Act’n
Pte G.D. Joliffe, Kill in Act’n
Pte. S. Hicks, Wounded & dis
Pte. W.O. Shier, I.A. Trans
Pte. W.A. Armstrong, I.A. Trans
Lce-Cpl J.W. Kitching, 152nd
Cpl N.J. Buddy, 152nd
Pte. A.M. Seabrook, 53rd
Pte G.L. Wells, 152nd
Pte G.OL. Wells, 152nd
Pte S.S. Smyer, 152nd
Pte. H.W. Morgan, 152nd
Pte G.H. Critchlow, 152nd
Pte. W.M.C. Jackson
Sergt F.C. Mitchell, 152nd
Pte. L.E. Wells, 46th
Pte. Frank FAir, 46th
Pte. G.G. Davis, 152nd
Pte A.E. King, 152nd
Pte. Chas. H. Wood, 152nd
Pte.Hy Positon, 152nd
Sergt. W.P. Sparling, 212th
Pte. Munro Elliott, C.A.M.C.
Pte. E.H.J. Vincent. C.A.M.C.
Pte. W.B. Butchart, 79th
Pte. Alex Turnbull, 79th
Pte Thos. Ryckman, Area A
Pte Jas Duncan, 161st
Pte Austin Wright
Pte Thos Jones, 48th
Pte B. Horseman
Pte Wm. Gosnell, killed
Pte. Frank A. Bell, 79th fld Amb.
Ptd Maurice Anderson
Pte J.R.B. Baser, 221st
Pte N. Broberg, R.C.D.
Pte Albert Brawn, 152nd
Ptd Arthur Geary
Pte Knox
~Carnduff Gazette April 13, 1916
Note, faint newspaper type, at times hard to read.




Canada now recruiting at the rate of a thousand men daily. 125,000 men have already been sent overseas. Recruiting to continue until we have defeated Germany and Prussianism, and if necessary Canada will send a Million Men to save World’s Civilization.~ Carnduff Gazette. April 20,1916


TO YOU AT HOME

Each night we panted till the runners came,
Bearing your letters through the battle-smoke.
Their path lay up Death Valley spouting flame,
Across the ridge where the Hun’s anger spoke
In bursting shells and cataracts of pain;
Then down the road where no one goes by day,
And so into the tortured, pockmarked plain
Where dead men clasp their wounds and point the way.
Here gas lurks treacherously and the wire
Of old defences tangles up the feet;
Faces and hands strain upward through the mire,
Speaking the anguish of the Hun’s retreat.
Sometimes no letters came; the evening hate
Dragged on till dawn. The ridge in flying spray
Of hissing shrapnel told the runners’ fate;
We knew we should not hear from you that day—
From you, who from the trenches of the mind
Hurl back despair, smiling with sobbing breath,
Writing your souls on paper to be kind,
That you for us may take the sting from Death.

BIBLIOGRAPHY
Carnduff & District Historical Society. A Stake in the West. Carnduff and District. ISBN 0-88925-116-9. Carnduff, SK. Friesen Printers. Altona, MB.

Carnduff Gazette 1914, 1915, 1916 Provincial Archives of Saskatchewan » Islandora Repository » Saskatchewan Historic Newspapers Online » Saskatchewan Historic Newspapers Online » Carnduff, SK

Dawson, Coningsby. The Glory of the Trenches.

Royal Canadian Legion No 216 – 202 4th St W, Carnduff, SK Facebook Page

The Royal Canadian Legion Saskatchewan Command. Military Service Recognition Book.

Sep 072015
 

The Rural Municipality of Stanley 215 began as Local Improvement District No. 11-C-2 before becoming L.I.D. No. 215. The Rm office is situated on Third Avenue West in Melville, Saskatchewan. Birmingham, Colmer, Duff, Fenwood, Goodeve, Hirzel, Kelsonia, Pearl Park, Pheasant Forks, Plain View, Robert and Rosemount post offices were within the RM boundaries. The hamlets and villages established within the area were Birmingham, Colmer, Duff, Fenwood, Goodeve, and Westview.

The R.M. of Stanley No. 215 History Book Committee compiled a listing with photographs of those veterans who served in World War I and World War II. They are asking to be contacted if any names were missed inadvertently.

In World War II, Fred and Jack DOCKERILL were killed in action along with Adam GRYGAR, William KOSTYSHYN, Henry LUTZKO, Irvin MILLER. They also list William DANIELS, John FLAT, Gustuf POLISHAK as members of the armed forces who gave the supreme sacrifice, but photos of these were unavailable. They have the veterans listed also for World War I, but without any killed in action.

The Goodeve memorial rink erected a plaque – In memory of the men of this district who gave their lives in the great war 1939-1945. Wm DANIELS, Wm KOSTYSHEN, A GRYGAR, H. Lutzko, A. POLISHAK. Over the years 1949-1952 funds were raised, and the memorial rink constructed.

Bibliography

Treasured Memories Unfold. Rural Municipality of Stanley 215. R.M. of Stanley No. 215 History Book Committee. Box 29. Fenwood, SK. S0A 0Y0. Friesen Printers. Altona, MB. ISBN 0-88925-989-5. 1992,

Aug 272015
 

Netherhill – a village at north west quarter of section 11 township 29 range 21 west of the third meridian -offered more men to the Canadian Expeditionary Force (C.E.F.) than any other town of its size. Col D.J. MacDonald, George Gear, Wm. J. Bourne, Ira Creed, Harry Ryan, Art Reed, Wm. Schell, John Lloyd, R. Deakins, Alton Leach, C. Sedore, Wm. Young, John King, Andy King, Les Loney, Wm. Scholey, John McRae, R. Menzies, John Dunlop, D.S. Cobb, R.P. Kay, Wm. Huser, Walter Siebert, James Anderson and Wm. Owen. The local branch of the The Great War Veterans’ Association (G.W.V.A.) began operating from the Eagle Lake School house.

Thos. Haddock, C. Togeson, Sgt. Ntzell, Geo. Robinson, Norman Fry-the first soldier casualty of the Canadian army-, George Pennell, Geo. Wellbelove, and Len Dixon did not return from the front, paying the supreme sacrifice.(p. 391-393) George Craig also remembers that Ed Shea, George Herman, Tom Simpson, Arthur Currie lost their lives in the Second World War.(p. 398)

Norman Fry, an army bugler was one of the first Canadian Soldiers to fall in World War I. Fry was a bugler in the English army before he came to Canada. While working for D.J. McDonald, Norman could be heard playing “Reveille” – first call- and “Lights Out”. Corporal Norman Fry of the Princess Pats was killed nearly immediately when the Canadian troops met the Germans. (p. 383 and 398)

Bill Netzel and Leonard Dixon also gave the supreme sacrifice. Others remembered were Bill Bourne, Bill Netzel, Les Loney, Jack King and the McDonald brothers. Toyeson also served with D.J. McDonald with the Strathcona Ligtht Horse. Toyeson was “literally blown to pieces” and nothing was found of him. (p. 383)

William (Bill) John Bourne, settling near Netherhill enlisted in the Winnipeg Rifles – the Little Black Devils. Bourne served as a sniper, and was often accompanied with the company of Tom Longboat. Bourne was injured in the Battle of Hill 70, and was rescued by German prisoners. Returning home on the “Aquitania” a ship converted to a hospital ship, he made it to New York safely despite the ship being torpedoed. (p. 417-419)

The biography of James (Jim) Rogers written up by Mr. and Mrs. B Gunnlaugson and Mrs. C. Ham. for Division 4 from the book; Memoirs of Hillsburgh. Jim had homesteaded on he north east quarter of section 2 township 30 range 19 west of the third meridian near his Uncle Joe. He was taken by snipers in the first world war. (p.145)William and Chester Kurtz,

James Calder from Aberdeenshire, Scotland settled near Brock. He had enlisted in World War I with the N.C.M.R. (Ninth Canadian Mounted Rifles) and the Royal Canadian Dragoons. He recounted an experience aboard ship enroute from Canada when a hurricane arose. The ship went some 500 miles off course due to the rudder of the ship being taken by the storm. (p.199)

Daniel G. Thomas left England to set up homesteading near Brock before enlisting in the first World War serving with the 53rd Battalion in France. After he was wounded he was sent to England to Work in the Orthopedic Hospital as a shoemaker, his first profession in England.

James (Jim) Anderson from Thomesville, ONtario enlisted with the First Canadian Engineers. On his discharge he bought land through the soldier’s settlement board.(p. 319)

D.J. MacDonald served with the Saskatchewan Light Horse Regiment as an officer. In 1914 he left overseas as a lieutenant and the youngest colonel in the Canadian army at the age of 28. He was wounded twice, and later commanded military outfits in Canada. During World War II he was Inspector General for Central Canada until his retirement as Major General. He was awarded the D.S.O. with two bars, the Military Cross, Order of the British Empire, and Order of Orange Nassau. MacDonald’s brother Roddie served as trooper with the Lord Strathcona Horse.(p.364)

Charles (Chas.) S. Smith who settled near Brock signed up for the Great War. To help with the 1916 “bumper crop” several “soldier boys” were granted harvest leave to return home to help out. Charlie Marcroft, Jimmy Campbell, Art Cann, Bob Arnold, Jimmy Thompson, Percy Parks and others were among whose who came home on temporary leave. Smith worked with the Soldier’s Settlement Board after his tour of duty and took up a soldier’s settlement claim near Naicam in 1922. (p. 249)

In the Rural Municipality of Hillsburgh a number of settlers filed homesteads with South African scrip, such as Dexter (Dic) R. Heberlee, and Jamws Millan Cameron to name a few.

Memoirs of Hillsburgh Rural Municipality No. 289 local history book remembers those who fell during the two Great Wars:

World War I:

  • DIXON, Leonard
  • FLEMING, Norman
  • FRY, Norman
  • HADDOCK, Thos.
  • HALDERSON, Kenneth
  • HALL, Fred
  • INGELS, James
  • MARCROFT, Chas.
  • NETZELL, Wm. T.
  • PARKS, Ernest
  • PARKS, Bruce
  • PEACOCK, J.
  • PENNELL, Geo. M
  • RIGHTON, W.
  • ROBINSON, Geo
  • ROGERS, James
  • THOMAS, Percy
  • TORGESON, G.E.
  • WALKER, Percy
  • WEATHERSPOON, David
  • WELLBELOVE, Geo.
  • YATES, Reginald

World War II:

  • BOVAIR, D.
  • CAMPBELL, Donald J
  • COCHRAN, John
  • CURRIE, Arthur
  • FOREMAN, Robert L
  • HERMAN, Geo.
  • MORE, Phyllis E
  • ROGERS, V
  • SHEA, Edward
  • SIMPSON, Thos.
  • STONEHOUSE, L

Hillsburgh Rural Municipality 289 no longer exists, it officially disorganised December 31, 1965. Amalgation took place with the Kindersley Rural Municipality No. 290 in 1965, and the Rural Municipality of Elma No. 291 amalgamated in 1951.

BIBLIOGRAPHY:

Memoirs of Hillsburgh Rural Municipality No. 289 Hillsburgh History Committee. c1955.

Adamson, Julia. 1921 Canada Census: Place of Habitation :: Rural Municipalities Saskatchewan Gen Web E-Magazine.

Aug 052015
 

The town of Sintaluta is located about 85 km east of Regina on the Trans-Canada Highway.

The Veterans of both World War I and World War II came together to unveil the Sintaluta War Memorial Cross in August 1948, on Decoration Day. This area is served by the Canadian Legion British Empire Service League (B.E.S.L.) Sintaluta Branch and the Royal Canadian Legion #18 Sintaluta Branch.

Some of the names who have fallen from this area were:

SURNAME Given
Bently Clarence WWI
Bishop Fredrick
Blakley Roy WWI
Boden J.S. WWI
Bogie Charles WWI
Davies Owen WWII
Deane E.B. WWI
Dolter Leo WWI
Forsyth Charlie WWI
Goldsmith Harry WWI
Gotwaltz Captain E.C. WWI
Grey Malcolm WWI
Harper Harry WWI
Hill Laird Robert WWII
Hiscock L.E. WWI
Hodgins David WWI
Jack Alex WWII
Jackson Arthur WWII
Joslyn Harold WWI
Joslyn Robert WWI
Kellow Claud
Luther Norman WWII
McGalasson Joseph WWI
Meers E.S. WWI
Partridge Charlie WWI
Partridge Harold WWI
Reeve Russell WWI
Snelgrove Robert WWI
Wilbur Garfield WWI
Wilson William WWI
Woodhouse Jack (John) WWI

The local history book, Tales of the Red Fox. also lists the veterans who served, and further historical information and photographs for their roll of honour.

Bibliography:

Tales of the Red Fox. Assiniboine Reserve, Town of Sintaluta, Districts Allindale, Durham, Blackwood, Red Fox, And Spring Coulee Sintaluta and District History Book Committee. Box 1984 Sintaluta, SK, S0G 4N0. ISBN 0-88925-498-2. 1985. Friesen Printers, Altona, Mb. pages. 157-174


The Royal Canadian Legion Saskatchewan Command Sintaluta Branch of the Canadian Legion (pdf) Page 45 Date accessed August 5, 2015.



Memorials Details Search Results Sintaluta two brass plaques CMP Home > DHH Home > Military Memorials NICMM > Memorials Details Search Results National Defence and The Canadian Forces. 2008-04-16. Date accessed August 5, 2015.


Sintaluta, Saskatchewan Wikipedia. 27 July 2015, Date accessed August 5, 2015.


Sintaluta The Encyclopedia of Saskatchewan. Canadian Plains Research Center. University of Regina. 2006. Date accessed August 5, 2015.

Jun 122015
 

Cando is a hamlet 48 km south of the City of North Battleford on highway 4 in Rosemount Rural Municipality No. 378, Saskatchewan, Canada. Classified as an unincorporated area, Cando locates at section 22-township 39- range 16-West of the 3rd Meridian at Latitude – Longitude (DMS) 52° 23′ 0″ N, 108° 14′ 2″ W.

The Cando history book entitled: Cando the Pioneer’s Echo written by the Cando and Area History Club in 1982 lists those who served in both the World Wars along with photos of the service personnel.  Additionally, the book shows an image of the crew and bomber W/O William Munro of the Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF).  A newspaper clipping relates that  W/O William M. Munro received an RCAF promotion to warrant officer from oberver.

Among the veterans listed in this book are those who fell in the World Wars, giving the supreme sacrifice.  William Watson is listed as killed in action for service in WWI.  Jack and William Eichler both fell in action.  Frank Allen was another casualty of war.

Jack and William Eichler were brothers, sons of Anton and Josie Eichler, immigrants from Austria who farmed the  south west quarter of section 34 township 39 range 14 west of the third meridian near Lizard Lake east of Cando.  Jack and William had four other siblings, Frank, Mary, Carl and Freda.  Freda also served in the army Canadian Women’s Army Corps (CWAC) during the second world war.

Source

Cando the Pioneer’s Echo  1982.  Cando and Area History Club.  McIntosh Publishing Company Limited, North Battleford, Saskatchewan.  This book covers Lizard Lake, Cando, Rosemount, Salter, the Rural Municipality Glenside 377, Rural Municipality Prairie 408, and Rural Municipality Rosemount 378, the school districts of Beswick, Bowmore, Cando, Norwick, Rowland Hill, Salter, Twin Gate and Willowfield.

Oct 092013
 

 

Montgomery Place.

Est. in 1946 by Our War Veterans.


Canadian Forces veterans built their homes in the Saskatoon neighborhood community of Montgomery Place during the years 1946-77. Montgomery Place was established with small agricultural land holdings outside the city of Saskatoon under the Federal Government’s Veteran’s Land Act (VLA) for men and women returning from World War II (1 September 1939 – 2 September 1945) and the Korean War (25 June 1950 – 27 July 1953).

 

Veterans Who Built Homes in Montgomery Place under The Veterans Land Act 1948-1977 Les anciens combattants qui ont construit des maison à Montgomery Place en vertu de la loi sur les terres destinées aux anciens combattants 1946-1977 Veterans Who Built Homes in Montgomery Place under The Veterans Land Act 1948-1977 Les anciens combattants qui ont construit des maison à Montgomery Place en vertu de la loi sur les terres destinées aux anciens combattants 1946-1977 Veterans Who Built Homes in Montgomery Place under The Veterans Land Act 1948-1977 Les anciens combattants qui ont construit des maison à Montgomery Place en vertu de la loi sur les terres destinées aux anciens combattants 1946-1977 Veterans Who Built Homes in Montgomery Place under The Veterans Land Act 1948-1977 Les anciens combattants qui ont construit des maison à Montgomery Place en vertu de la loi sur les terres destinées aux anciens combattants 1946-1977 Montgomery Place Monument, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan Montgomery Place Monuments, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan MontgomeryPlace Montgomery Place War Veterans Monument Caen, Normandy, France monument in Montgomery Place, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada Batle of Ortona Plaque in Montgomery place, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada Field Marshal B.L. Montgomery ( November 17, 1887 –  March 24, 1976) Plaque

For More Information
Montgomery Place Street Naming History and Veterans Land Act History