Jul 142015
 

 

Will These World War I War Medals Make Their Way Home?

Can you help?

British War Medal World War One

World War One British War Medal


…..Peter Willcock began a search to locate the descendants of a World War I veteran in the hopes to restore the war medals to the John Bryson’s family ancestors. Beginning in Ontario, this mystery unravels with ancestral clues found overseas in Scotland, and continues with a search for descendants in Western Canada – Saskatchewan and Manitoba. It is hoped that the family of John Bryson can be located.

…..Willcock is helping a friend to track down the family. “When my friend was a boy, his family moved into a a rental house in what today is the Toronto area. That’s probably about 50 years ago now. There was a pile of junk in the basement which his mother asked him to clean out. In the process he found this WW1 medal, and he kept it all these years until maybe 5-6 years ago when he tried to start looking for some family member or descendant who might like to have the medal.”

…..Willcock came to his friend’s assistance as he had a computer whereas, his friend was not online. In the course of their online research they have delved into quite a lot of information. They feel that they may have possibly identified grand nieces or nephews in Scotland.

John Bryson

…..The veteran’s name is John Bryson; Regimental Number 105984; who resided on a farm in Indian Head, Saskatchewan in the year 1921. He was single, and aged 38. He was born Eaglesham, Renfrewshire, Scotland in October 31, 1883. He reported an address of Palmer House, Regina, Saskatchewan when he enlisted April 4, 1916. James Bryson, of Cambuslang, Lanarkshire, Scotland was given as his next of kin – his father. John’s employment was recorded as teamster. A “teamster” originally “referred to a person who drove a team of draft animals, usually a wagon drawn by oxen, horses, or mules.”

…..In the book, Indian Head : history of Indian Head and district on page 165, the local history book committee state that James Bryson was wounded in World War I, and no other “Bryson” are listed in the World War I honour roll. There is another Bryson mentioned in the book, however, that of Jean Bryson who married James Harvey Francis (1859 Pakenham, Ontario-), namesake of the town of Francis. Miss Jean Craig Bryson (Mrs. Jean Francis) was the daughter of the Honourable Senator George Bryson of Fort Coulonge, Quebec, and together they had a son, Jonathon Francis. George Bryson, Sr. was the son of James Bryson and Jane Cochrane and arrived in 1814 to Ramsay, Lanark, Ontario. George married Robina Cobb in 1845, and had seven children – two of whom were George Bryson Junior, and Thomas Bryson. However, this book makes no mention of John Bryson at all, unless he went by a nick name of James Bryson. Nor is there any evidence that John Bryson was related to the aforementioned Jean Bryson and the notable Bryson figures from Quebec.

…..

Alexander Sr. Bryson (Sandy)

…..It is believed that Alexander Sr. Bryson (Sandy) was John’s uncle, and that Alexander lived in Sintaluta, Saskatchewan. Alexander (1869-Sept 21, 1958) was born 1869 in Eaglesham, Scotland, and had five children after he married Jeanie Moffat (1867-1920). Sandy arrived in 1911, and his family followed in 1912. He lived on township 17 range 11 west of the second meridian. His children were (William) James (1893 – 1933), Alex Jr. (1895-1916 threshing accident), John (Jack) (1897- ), Tom (1900- ), and a daughter Jeanie aged 12 on the 1916 census. Jean went on to marry Mr. Boyd and reside in Vantage, Saskatchewan. Jack and Thomas themselves, relocated to Winnipeg, Manitoba according to page 338 of the book, Sintaluta 1880-1984 / Tales of the Red Fox: Assiniboine Reserve, Town of Sintaluta, Districts of Allindale, Durham, Blackwood, Red Fox, and Spring Coulee.

…..The eldest of the family, listed as William in the local history book, and as James on the Canadian Census, enlisted July 28, 1915, recorded his occupation as a farmer at Sintaluta, and married. James Bryson 115055, lists Cambuslang, Scotland, as his place of birth on his enlistment record and went overseas with the 10th Canadian Mounted Rifles.

….Another brother, Corporal John Bryson 115056, born December 10, 1897, enlisted December 19, 1914, at Shorncliff and states that he is, at the time, an unmarried farmer. His next of kin listed was Alexander Bryson, of Sintaluta, Saskatchewan. He also was born in Cambuslang, Scotland. John was placed with the 10th Canadian Mounted Rifles.

….The youngest brother, SPR Thomas Bryson 2504238, enlisted with a birth date of June 9, 1899, and gave his mother, Jeanie Bryron, of Sintaluta, Saskatchewan as his next of kin.  It was a practice for younger men to alter their birth dates in order to enlist and serve their country.  Sapper (abbreviated Spr) is the Royal Engineers’ equivalent of Private He listed that he was a labourer when he signed up in Winnipeg, Manitoba on June 1, 1918. Tom recorded Glasgow, Scotland as his location of birth. He initially served with Regina Recruits Engineers.

Location

…..According to Map quest Indian Head and Sintaluta are 18 kilometers (11 miles) apart, and both are currently located on the Trans – Canada 1 highway. In the era of horse and buggy or ox and cart this would enable relatives to help one another out during times of harvest. On average, a horse walks at approximately 4 miles per hour (6.5 km/hour) which would make it a three hour journey between Indian Head and Sintaluta. It was common that relatives would homestead and farm near one another to assist with homestead duties and harvest.

…..On an historical railway map of 1925, it can be see that Indian Head and Sintaluta were both on the Canadian Pacific Transcontinental Railway (West). Indian Head, the closer of the two locations to the provincial capital of Regina is 70 kilomters (44 miles) from that city. Indian Head locates at the legal land location of section 24- township 18- range 13-West of the second meridian at Latitude – Longitude (DMS) 50° 32′ 1″ N, 103° 40′ 3″ W, and Sintaluta at section 33- township 17 – range 11-West of the 2nd meridian or Latitude – Longitude (DMS) 50° 28′ 37″ N, 103° 26′ 59″ W.

…..It is interesting to note that the “The Bryson Maur School Dist No 3312 historical one room school house was located on the SE quarter of section 29 township 24 range 19 W2″. Bill Barry gives the spelling of this same school house as Bryn Mawr school 33312 at the same location; SE 29 24 19 W2. Barry attributes the name to a settler from Wales who named it after Brynmawr in Wales, so it is not likely that the first name Bryson Maur had any roots in this Bryson family.

Can you help?

…..It is with heartfelt wishes that some kind reader recognizes the family, and can come forward as an ancestor of John Bryson, the holder of these World War One Medals. Perhaps the The Royal Canadian Legion may be able to help out. They even have a Sintaluta branch, and an Indian Head branch and so they may even know this John Bryson. “Legion members care deeply about supporting the men and women who serve this country and want to make a difference in the lives of Veterans, contribute to our communities, and Remember those who made the ultimate sacrifice for our Country…The Royal Canadian Legion [members] …. make a difference in the lives of Veterans and their families, provide essential services within our communities, and Remember the men and women who made the ultimate sacrifice for our Country.”

…..Perhaps the Indian Head townspeople can know of the family and can pinpoint the relations of John Bryson, or similarly, Sintaluta historians may remember the family of Alexander Bryson. In this way, the relatives can contact Willcock. The Winnipeg library or archives may have information about John (Jack) Bryson or Tom Bryson in an Henderson’s Directory. The hamlet of or “designated place” of Vantage is considered a ghost town. It may be that the Rural Municipality No. 103 – SUTTON would have information about the residents, and Mrs. Jeanie (nee Bryson) Boyd who took residence there.

….. Trying to identify the family of John Bryson presents a mystery, indeed, to Willcock, and his friend. With a few key details, they are trying to locate the rightful owner of the military medals. By furthering their enquiry online and receiving tips, Willcock searched outside of the province of Ontario. to seek out the rightful owner.

…..In Australia and New Zealand, the Purple Hearts Reunited are groups of researchers have come together to return lost medals to veterans or to their families. With success stories such as lost war medals returned after facebook post, it is hoped, that these war medals, too, may make their way back to John Bryson’s ancestors.

…..These precious mementos bestowed upon a Canadian military veteran, would come home at last if they could be restored. Medals “connect recipients to a time in their lives when serving our nation took precedence over all else. ” As the centenary of the First World War (1914-1918) is being commemorated and remembered, what fitting tribute, that to find the home of a distinctive, original, valuable, irreplaceable medal. This would provide the family with an ancestral connection to their family member who served, and who fought for our country. The medals themselves, honour the man, John Bryson, and the sacrifices he made for this country of Canada.

Follow up:

Posting a query on Ancestry.com posting boards, ELLinSpain, replied that the following may be the family on the census of 1891 and 1901 respectively.

If the issue of John Bryson, born Eaglesham, Renfrewshire, Scotland on October 31, 1883 and settled in Saskatchewan, CA, cannot be found, (moving forward in time), then perhaps the sisters or brothers of John Bryson may have living family to whom the medals could be restored.


1891

James Bryson 50

James Bryson 24

Jane Bryson 22

Adam Bryson 20

Robert Bryson 14

Elizabeth Bryson 12

Isabella Bryson 10

John Bryson 8

Nathaniel Bryson 6

Mark Bryson 3

Paisley High Church

County: Renfrewshire

Address: 2 West Campbell St


+


1901

James Bryson 60

Robert Bryson 24

Lizzie Bryson 22

Nathaniel Bryson 16

Mark Bryson 13

SAME ADDRESS


+


BROTHER

Name: Mark Bryson

Age in 1911: 24

Estimated birth year: abt 1887

Birth Place: Paisley

Search Photos:

County/Island: Military

Country: England

Military Unit: 1st Battlion Seaport Highlanders

Registration District Number: 641

ED, institution, or vessel: India

Piece: 34990


Bibliography:

Geographic Names of Saskatchewan
Barry, Bill. Centax Books, A Division of PrintWest Communications Ltd. 2005. ISBN 1-897020-19-2

Indian Head: History of Indian Head and District.

The History Book Committee
Indian Head, Saskatchewan The History Book Committee 1984

ISBN Number 0919781268 / 9780919781269

Sintaluta 1880-1984 / Tales of the Red Fox
Assiniboine Reserve, Town of Sintaluta, Districts of Allindale, Durham, Blackwood, Red Fox, and Spring Coulee

Published 1985 by Sintaluta & District History Book Committee .
ISBN 10 0889254982

Chabun, Will. Mini-mystery surrounds Sask. Veteran’s medal. Regina Leader Post. July 28, 2015. Article also appears: Star Phoenix Facebook Star Phoenix

All online sources are embedded in the text of the story as hyper links.

To contribute or add further information, please e-mail

The above web page was created and placed online by
author Julia Adamson ,
and researcher
Peter Willcock

Jun 302015
 

Clouston is located ten miles outside of Prince Albert to the south west. It is situated on section 13 township 27 range 47 west of the second meridian and was located on the Canadian National Railway line.

Harry Dennis gave the supreme sacrifice World War I September 1, 1918. He disembarked from Canada on May 19, 1915 after enlisting at Prince Albert. George Bannerman Senior, George Bennett, Benjamin Clark, H. Erasmus, Ian Hewison, Samuel McKay, and James Woodhouse were all listed as killed in action during the Great War.

In World War II, Harry Anderson was killed in action. Those who did not return from World War II, were Lloyd Adams, Harry Anderson, Louis Brunning, Cecil Fidler, Clarence Lorenson, Clifford Mackie, Norman Massey, Duncan McDonald, William Mitchell, Jack Nelson, James Tait and Irving Wesley.

George Bennett was the son of Alfred Ernest Bennett , and Mary Campbell. George was killed at Passchendale, November 11, 1917, His brothers Thomas and Henry both enlisted but arrived home. Altogether the family had eight children.

James Woodhouse (1895-1917) and his siblings left Wallsend, England arriving in Canada with the Barr Colonists. The first brother, Cuthbert stayed in Canada and filed for homesteads in the Lily Plain district. Two brothers, Edwin and Jim served in World War I. Jim fell in 1917.

Colin McKay, and his brother Larry McKay both served in World War one serving overseas. Colin received serious injuries and died overseas. These brothers were the sons of Thomas McKay and Catherine McBeth.1/

Louis Brunning, born December 27, 1923, was the son of John and Irene Brunning according to the family history written by Marjorie Byers (Brunning). The family had eleven children. Loretta joined the air force, Harold was with the Regina Rifles, and later the air force. Louis was taken on June 6, 1944.

Duncan McDonald, the son of James Alexander McDonald, and Mrs. Lillian McDonald, was born in 1919. Serving as an Air Gunner, he was killed in action of November 9, 1941 while engaged at Hamburg, Germany.

Clarence Lorenson, the son of Leis Lorenson and Mary Ethel Smith. Clarence was born in 1919, the second of six children.

William Mitchell was the son of David Pearne Mitchell, and Elizabeth Selina Mills. David Mitchell served with the British Army Reserve during World War I serving as Corporal, receiving an honourable discharge after injury from sniper fire. William David (Billy) was born April 9, 1921, serving as a gunnery bombadier and navigation instructor. He lost his life on a training mission May 24, 1944 in Dafoe, Saskatchewan. William’s brother, Jack also served in World War Two with the Regina Rifles before transfer to the South Saskatchewan Rifles. Serving overseas, he was wounded, and received an honourable discharge in 1945.

James Tate was the son of Eugene TAte and Maria Adams. They had a family of twelve children. James fell in 1945.

Source:
Echoes Of Our Heritage. Chapter:Veterans. ISBN 0-88925-523-7. Clouston History Book. R.R. 3 Box 6 Site 3 Prince Albert, SK. Friesen Printers. Alton, MB.

Jun 222015
 

The “Shellbrook Chronicle ” on August 26, 1919 ran an article regarding the memorial service held in HOLBEIN SCHOOL DISTRICT 641 one room schoolhouse regarding the servicemen who fell in World War I. Ptes. Leon Hoopfer, Andrew Hislop, Jack Pearce, Paul Skotte, Oscar Soberg were all remembered for their service overseas.

A tombstone was erected by Earl Spencer at the Churchyard at Church Brampton, United Kingdom. The inscription bears the words; “Pte. Leon Edwin Hoopfer, of Holbein, Saskatchewan, Canada, 46th Canadians, D Company, died 20th August 1918, aged 20 years – For Freedeom.” Hoopfer, passed at the Brampton V.A.D. hospital at the age of 20. The Rector of Brampton, R.Leach kept in touch with Leon’s mother, Mrs. R.J. Hoopfer, and let her know of the thoughtfulness of the residents in Brampton.

The Wild Rose and ARea History Book Committee included a veterans section in their book, Footprints of Our Pioneers, Briarlea, Crutwell, Holbein, Nixbet, Rozilee, and Wild Rose. Included are the names and photos of those who served from the Briarlea, Crutwell, Holbein, Nixbet, Rozilee, and Wild Rose areas.

Forest (Forrest) BATHROW, Leon HOOPFER, “Sandy Stuart” James Alexander STUART, Joe BROWN, Harold CHAPMAN, Andrew HISLOP, Augustine KEANE, John MCKAY, Murdock MCKAY, James MILNE, Harold PEARCE, Jack PEARCE, Paul SKOTTE, Oscar SOBERG, Rowest TWISS gave the supreme sacrifice in World War I. Glen Rose CAMPBELL, Keith HADLEY, Neville HADLEY, George HALLIDAY, F.D.J. (Jack) SMITH, Robert TAYLOR fell in World War II.

Forrest BATHROW was the son of Ezra Bathrow who had filed for homestead on the south east quarter of section 10 township 40 range 2 west of the third meridian.

Harold Wilfred Pearce who was born in Gloucestershire, England also fell in the Great War. A homesteader on South West quarter section 25, township 49 range 1 in 1914, Pearce enlisted becoming Sergeant of the 5th Overseas Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force, CEF. He was killed in action July 18, 1917.

James Alexander (sandy) STUART was born in Drumlithie, Scotland, according to Marg Muirhead. Sandy, his sister Nellie and her husband Archie WASON, Sandy’s parents, and a brother Fred followed Sandy’s sister Georgina who had arrived in Canada eight years earlier, and married Walter BROWN. Sandy settled in the Rozilee area of Saskatchewan when he arrived. Sandy signed up to serve in World War I at Winnipeg, Manitoba to serve as a private with the 179th Cameron Highlanders. Sandy was transferred to the 43rd when he arrived in France. On April 17, 1917, the family was told that Sandy was missing in action. The military later informed the family that Sandy was killed on Vimy Ridge.

In the newspaper report that told of J.A. STUART missing in action, the newspaper also reported that “E.J. Nelson, Sturgeon Valley, 188th Battalion, Frank Dreaver, Mistawasis, 188th Batt., Corporal Wilson, late of R.N.W.M. Police, Shellbrook, Coldstream Guards” (page 722) were killed.

Wilbert KEATING settled in the Rozilee district on the north west quarter of section 31 township 49 range 2 west of the third meridian and the south east quarter of section 6 township 50 range 2 west of the third meridian. He fell in World War I, and the family donated his 38-55 Winchester Rifle to the Prince Albert Museum.

Joe BROWN was also born in Drumlithie, Scotland. Joe, and his brother Walter arrive in the area around Rozilee. Joe began homesteading on the north east quarter of section 6 township 50 range 2 west of the third meridian. Joe served as Lance Corporal when he wrote home from France.

Robert TWISS filed on the north east quarter of section 4 township 50 range 1 west of the third meridian near Briarlea. It was right around the time that he filed for his homestead that he enlisted in the service, and not much is known locally about him. His sister received title to his land when he fell at Vimy Ridge during the war. Robert Dudley TWISS enlisted in Prince Albert in 1915, and served as Lieutenant with the 43rd Battalion, Manitoba Regiment.

Of the nine children born to Cecil and Pearl HADLEY, four served in the armed forces, and two were lost. <A href="http://svwm.ca/casualty-display/?ID=A000008075È"Captain Neville Hughes HADLEY'éa" served with the South Saskatchewan Regiment and fell August 28, 1944. Flying Officer Keith Bayfield HADLEY served with the Royal Canadian Air Force RCAF until April 25 1944 when was taken.

SOURCE:
Footprints of Our Pioneers, Briarlea, Crutwell, Holbein, Nizbet, Rozilee, and Wild Rose. 1990. ISBN 0-858925-917-8 Wild Rose and Area History Book Committee. Shellbrook, SK. Friesen Printers.

Jun 132015
 

David Vivian Currie, VC, CD was born July 8, 1912 and served in the Second World War with the 29th Canadian Armoured Reconnaissance Regiment (South Alberta Regiment). Currie was awarded the Victoria Cross for gallantry while in command of a group of tanks and the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders of Canada infantry while posted at St. Lambert-sur-Dives.

Currie was given the task “on 18 August 1944 to capture and hold the village of St Lambert-sur-Dives during the fighting to block the escape route of large German forces cut off in the Falaise pocket.[2]” “The Germans were out in the open; the Canadians were dug in. ‘We were lucky,’ Currie said, ‘We suffered no casualties from our own guns, but it had a very devastating effect on the Germans.’” [3]

The London Gazette article of Friday November 1944 recounts the honour when King George V1 pinned the Victoria Cross on Currie’s Chest. Currie was rushed to Buckingham Palace to receive the award. This newspaper article says; “The courage and devotion to duty shown by Major Currie during a prolonged period of heavy fighting were outstanding and had a far-reaching effect on the successful outcome of the battle.” “When had he first heard of the award? Well his unit commander had called him in. He just said, “You’re now Major Currie, V.C.” How did he feel? Well it was a jolt. He had to sit down very suddenly to get over the shock.”[1]

Currie had joined the militia in 1939, and the Regular Army in 1940. He moved quickly up the ranks, promoted to Lieutenant and then to Captain by 1941. In 1944 he was awarded the rank of Major.

Currie retired from the army with the rank of lieutenant colonel. Upon retirement from the militia, he served eighteen years as a Sergeant at Arms in the Canadian House of Commons. Currie was also awarded the Canadian Forces Decoration ( “CD”) which is bestowed upon Canadian Forces personnel after completion of twelve years military service

The Lt. Colonel D.V. Currie Armoury In Moose Jaw is named in his honour as is Currie Avcnue in Montgomery Place of the City of Saskatoon. Ontario has erected an historical plaque in his honour.

Currie was born in the town of Sutherland, Saskatchewan. The town was annexed in 1956 as a neighbourhood in the city of Saskatoon. Currie survived the war, passing away June 20 1986 at the age of 73 in Ottawa, Ontario.

Bibliography:
1944: Major David Currie battles in Normandy, wins V.C. CBC.ca. Date accessed June 13, 2015.

Armstrong, Bart. Trained as an Auto Mechanic and Welder, goes off to war and proves Heroic. Reocmmended for DSO, but gets awarded the Victoria Cross. January 19, 2014. Canadian Medal of Honor. Date accessed June 13, 2015.

Boswell, Randy and Lynn McAuley. Province with a Heart: Celebrating 100 Years in Saskatchewan Saskatoon StarPhoenix and Regina Leader-Post. Edition illustrated. CanWest Books, 2005. ISBN 0973671904, 9780973671902. Digitized online by Google Books. Date accessed June 13, 2015.

Coneghan, Daria and David G. Marshall. Victoria Cross Saskatchewan Recipients. Canadian Plains Research Center. University of Regina. 2006.

David Vivian Currie Wikipedia. June 11, 2015. Version ID 666496322 Date accessed June 13, 2015.

Victoria Cross Winners The Saskatchewan Dragoons. 24 Aug 2003. Date accessed June 13, 2015.

[1] Scott, Lieut. Jack. Major Currie Given jolt when told of V.C. award. The Maple Leaf. November 28, 1944. Google news archive. Date accessed June 13, 2015.

[2] Victoria Cross – Second World War, 1939-1945. David Vivian Currie. National Defence and the Canadian Forces. 2009-04-14 Date accessed June 13, 2015.

David Vivian Currie Badass of the Week. Date accessed June 13, 2015.

Victoria Cross recipient and Second World War tough buy: Major David Vivian Currie December 2, 2014. Discover Blog. Library and Archives Canada Blog. Date accessed June 13, 2015.

[3] Whitaker, Shelagh and Dennis Whitaker. Normandy: The Real Story Edition unabridged. Random House Publishing Group, 2009. ISBN 0307538974, 9780307538970. Digitized online by Google Books. Date accessed June 13, 2015.

Jun 132015
 

The hamlet of Esk locates at section 12-township 33-range 21-West of the 2nd meridian or Latitude – Longitude (DMS) 51° 49′ 0″ N, 104° 51′ 2″ W south of the Yellowhead or Saskatchewan Provincial Highway 16 at the intersection of secondary highway 667. Esk is west of Jansen in the Rural Municipality of Prairie Rose #309

Jansen is also situated south of the Yellowhead or Saskatchewan Provincial Highway 16 and north of the Canadian Pacific Railway at section 36-township 32- range 20-West of the 2nd meridian Latitude – Longitude (DMS) 51° 47′ 12″ N, 104° 42′ 59″ W .

In the two volume set, Prairie Rose Memories, the Prairie Rose Historical Society lists those veterans who served in the Great War, in World War II, those who were active in both the World Wars along with those who fell serving their country with the Royal Canadian Mounted Police the North West Mounted Police.

The following listing are the servicemen who gave the supreme sacrifice.

Fred Wilson, George Russell, Aubrey Wilson, Frank Wilson enlisted with the 78th Battalion in World War I and did not return. The local history committee was fortunate to have a photo in the book of the 78th battalion and the names of the six servicemen; accompanying Arthur Moore. In addition to the four who fell, Walter Moore and George Barclay are portrayed in the image.

George Aubrey Wilaon was farming north of Jansen on the north west quarter of section 12 township 33 range 20 until he enlisted in 1914. Aubrey, the son of Joseph Wilson and Caroline Redden was kileed at Vimy Ridge. He came from a family of nine children, his younger siblings were, Clark, Allison, Albert, Clara, Pearl, Annie, Frank Claude and Lorne. On April 9, 1917, while serving with the 78th Battalion, Manitoba Regiment Aubrey fell. He is commemorated on the Vimy Memorial.

Aubrey’s brother Allison had moved to Australia in 1910 before, he too, enlisted in WWI.

Sergeant Frank Claude Wilson was working on the family farm when he enlisted. Awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal, and promoted to Sergeant, he was killed in action (KIA) at Caix, France on August 8, 1918. Frank also served with the 78th Battalion, Manitoba Regiment

George Edgar Russell was taken April 9, 1917, Private he served with the D Company 78th Battalion, Manitoba Regiment as well. George was the son of Andrew Wallace and Elizabeth Russell. George had come west to farm near Jansen, SK when he enlisted in Winnipeg, MB. Born May 8, 1891 in Ottawa, ON, and is buried in Cabaret – Rouge British Cemetery, Pas de Calais, France.

Irwin C. Klein, Willis Hardie and Robert Kochorek fell in the Second World War.

Irwin Klein born 1922 joined the air force training as an air gunner. Irwin was taken March 14, 1944. Georege Klein and Emilie Kuhler were his parents arriving to North Dakota from Russia and from there settling near Esk in 1905. Pilot Irvine George Klein served with the No. 431 Squadron is buried at Stonefall Cemetery, Harrogate, North Yorkshire, England.

Willis Hardie gave the supreme sacrifice August 8, 1944 was the son of William and Lydia Hardie who were from Dafoe, Saskachewan. Willis served with the Queen’s Own Camerson Highlanders of Canada and is buried at the Bretteville-Su-Laize Canadian War Cemetery. Calvados, France.

Robert Kochorek was the son of August Kotschorek and Hilda Briske. They immigrated from Russia to Winnipeg. In 1907 the family was homesteading near Jansen on the north east section quarter of section 14 township 33 range 19 west of the second meridian. Robert enlisted at Fort Garry, Manitoba in 1940. While overseas Robert was wounded twice in Sicily and killed in action in 1944 while serving in Italy.

Prairie Rose Memories features many of the service personnel photos along with an image of coupons from a Ration Book.

Those listed from the Royal Canadian Mounted Police are Robert A. Briske, Harlow Doidge, Myron Freisen, Terry Friesen, RAymond Kielan, Edwin Langner, Kenneth Turner, Bernice (Turner) Hopp andGodron Wiens.

The Jansen Branch of the Royal Canadian Legion was formed in July of 1946.

Bibliography
Prairie Rose Memories Volume I ISBN 1-55056-008-5. 1992. Prairie Rose Historical Society. Friesen Printers. Altona, Mb.

Prairie Rose Memories Volume II ISBN 1-55056-008-5 1992. Prairie Rose Historical Society. Friesen Printers. Altona, Mb.

Jun 122015
 

Elfros and Leslie, Saskatchewan Virtual War Memorial

 

The Royal Canadian Legion Leslie Branch 172, Royal Canadian Legion Elfros Branch 237, Elfros Ladies Auxiliary R.C.L. No. 237 Saskatchewan Command and Leslie Ladies Auxiliary organized in tribute to those veterans who have served in the Canadian Armed Forces. These organizations honour those comrades who have fallen in the past and to honour those who continue to serve in the future. Veterans and their dependants can rest assured of the support of these fraternal organizations formed to work for the welfare of their Comrades, their families and the community.

Elfros Branch 237 formed April 30, 1945. They, along with the other organisations, hope to continue assisting Veterans, Comrades, and the community for many years to come

The history book committee in charge of the two volume set; From Prairie Trails to the Yellowhead provided history about the Rural Municipality of Elfros #307, the villages of Elfros and Leslie, along with the hamlet of Mozart. They provided as many military pictures as they could obtain, as well as a listing of those who served with the Canadian Forces. Along with the memories of the veterans, they provided the discharge certificate for Edward James Attfield who served with the First Depot Battalion Sask Regiment, a photo of the cover to a ration book, and a City of Elfros sample certificate welcoming home their comrades A group picture of the 223 Battalion (Scandinavian), Troops leaving Elfros W.W.I, and the No. 16 Platoon of 214 Overseas Battalion, and the names of those in the group image. Another photograph depicts Carl Sveinson, and bomber crew on bond selling mission, and the Girl Guides who form a Guard of Honour. There is another group image of five armed forces personnel, C. McPhail, Cever Johnson, Peter Bennett and David Hunter. Eleven other group pictures feature two or three people in the images, these are along with the many individual military personnel photos included in the book.

 

Elfros village is located at 51° 44′ 36″ N, 103° 51′ 39″ W section 13-township 32-range 14-West of the 2nd meridian. It is northeast of Regina and southeast of the Quill Lakes at the junction of Provincial Highways 16 and 35.

 

Leslie is located just off of Highway 16 between Foam Lake and Elfros. The post office began as Leslie Station between 1906 and 1909. Leslie Village located at South east section 36 township 31 range 13 west of the second meridian. In Geographic Names of Saskatchewan, it was noted that Fairland was the first post office in the area which closed down when the rail was laid.

Mozart located at North east section 25 township 32 range 15 west of the second meridian or 51° 46′ 33″ N, 103° 59′ 39″ W. Once again, Bill Barry affirms that Laxdal was the original post office in the area – Section 4 township 33 range 14 west of the second meridian- between 1907 and 1909 until the Mozart hamlet formed at the Canadian Pacific Siding and established a post office there in 1909.

 

Royal Canadian Legion Elfros Branch 237 erected a cenotaph honouring those who lost their lives in service (as follows).

 

BENNETT, Russell BENNETT, Peter BLACK, Francis COOK, Herbert
GISLASON, John GOVIER, George SMITH, Donald SMITH, Gilbert

 

From records at the National War Memorial and Library And Archives Canada, Canadian Expeditionary Force records that could be found, some moire information follows:

To the family of Edward BENNETT and Hanna CRUISE from Northern Ireland were born nine children. Peter served in the First World War for the 214th Brigade. William Peter BENNETT born Lachute Quebec, was born Jan 16, 1898 and signed up February 12, 1916. Russell Alexander Bennett, was born Lachute Argenteul, Quebec April of 1894. Russell, a homesteader near Kelvington when he enlisted was taken June 1916, Peter fell October 1917. Dave Hunter and Charlie McPhail enlisted along with Russel. Russel and Peter had siblings of Katie, Lorne, George, Cora, Elsie, Jessie and Stanley Lorne served in World War II. Private Russel BENNETTis laid to rest in Menin Gate (Ypres) Memorial in Belgium June 5, 1916. Russel served with the 1st Canadian Mounted Rifles (Saskatchewan Regiment) Private William Peter Bennett was laid to rest at the same cemetery November 6, 1917 and he served with the Canadian Infantry (Saskatchewan Regiment 28th Battallion).

 

Jon Gislason was born November 19, 1917, and was killed in action in Normandy on June 4, 1944. Before this he was hired on as a farm hand. Jon was born to Johannes Gislason and Sigurveig Arnason. Jon had five brothers and three sisters, Arnie, Gudjon, Daniel, Kari, Vilhelmina, Anna Sigrun, Ann Holosko, Helga S and Einar Gislason. Gudjon, Daniel and Einar also served in World War II in the army. Jon A was born in Iceland, and provided an address near Oakview, Manitoba on enlistment

George GOVIER enlisted June 1915 in Wadena. Govier, born April 11, 1892 served with the 31st Battalion in the Canadian Infrantry (Alberta Regiment), and was buried at Hastings Cemetery, Sussex, United Kingdom after he gave the supreme sacrifice, February 27, 1919.

 

Sergeant LAC Donald Henry Smith was taken April 12, 1943 after serving with the Royal Canadian Air Force. He is interred at Warwick Cemetery, Warwickshire, United Kingdom.

 

Gilbert James Smith fell January 28, 1945, and is buried in the Elfros Cemetery in Saskatchewan. Gilbert, the son of James and Marion SMITH served with the Royal Canadian Air Force. had enlisted September 24, 1914 at Valcartier, Quebec. Born Kendal, Westmorland, England, Gilbert gave the address of Woodlande Kendal, England of James Smith, his next of kin, when he enlisted. The Canadian Over-Seas Expeditionary Force attestation paper lists his date of birth as July 7, 1888.

Norman Hugh Smith, born in Elfros, enlisted in the Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) in 1942. While serving with Squadron 153, he received notice that his brother Gilbert fell in action at the age of 22. Gilbert also served with the RCAF.

 
Sources are embedded within the post – Julia Adamson author

Jun 122015
 

Cando is a hamlet 48 km south of the City of North Battleford on highway 4 in Rosemount Rural Municipality No. 378, Saskatchewan, Canada. Classified as an unincorporated area, Cando locates at section 22-township 39- range 16-West of the 3rd Meridian at Latitude – Longitude (DMS) 52° 23′ 0″ N, 108° 14′ 2″ W.

The Cando history book entitled: Cando the Pioneer’s Echo written by the Cando and Area History Club in 1982 lists those who served in both the World Wars along with photos of the service personnel.  Additionally, the book shows an image of the crew and bomber W/O William Munro of the Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF).  A newspaper clipping relates that  W/O William M. Munro received an RCAF promotion to warrant officer from oberver.

Among the veterans listed in this book are those who fell in the World Wars, giving the supreme sacrifice.  William Watson is listed as killed in action for service in WWI.  Jack and William Eichler both fell in action.  Frank Allen was another casualty of war.

Jack and William Eichler were brothers, sons of Anton and Josie Eichler, immigrants from Austria who farmed the  south west quarter of section 34 township 39 range 14 west of the third meridian near Lizard Lake east of Cando.  Jack and William had four other siblings, Frank, Mary, Carl and Freda.  Freda also served in the army Canadian Women’s Army Corps (CWAC) during the second world war.

Source

Cando the Pioneer’s Echo  1982.  Cando and Area History Club.  McIntosh Publishing Company Limited, North Battleford, Saskatchewan.  This book covers Lizard Lake, Cando, Rosemount, Salter, the Rural Municipality Glenside 377, Rural Municipality Prairie 408, and Rural Municipality Rosemount 378, the school districts of Beswick, Bowmore, Cando, Norwick, Rowland Hill, Salter, Twin Gate and Willowfield.

Jun 112015
 

Middle Lake Veterans with Canada’s Fighting Forces

Middle Lake is situated just to the west of Saskatchewan Provincial Highway 20 east of Lucien Lake. The village locates at section 31- township 40- range 23-West of the 2nd meridian or Latitude – Longitude (DMS) 52° 28′ 58″ N, 105° 18′ 28″ W according to Canadian Geographical Names.

The Middle Lake Celebrate Saskatchewan History Book Committee compiled a list of veterans in their book; Middle Lake the Vintage Years A History of the village of Middle Lake Including school districts of Grove Lake, Middle Lake, Merrywood, Mackintosh, Lake Ignace, Lucien Lake and Wilfred published in 1982. Besides the listing, they have also compiled a gallery of photos of those who have served from the area. A sample of a certificate of service, is also included in this local history book.

Abel, Otto Abel, Philip Baker, Edward Brockmann, George Brunyanski Ed. Brunyanski, Leslie
Forrwald, Sylvester Fischer, Louis Grant, Jos. Gretz, Lawrence Grudnmann, Otto Gebkenjans, Herman
Gebkenjans, John Hoffman, Ernest Halischuk, Fred Halischuck, John Heppner, Geo. Hanke, John
Little, Willie Livingstone, ivan Livingstone, Henry McDougall, Max MacLeod, J.W. Miller, Hubert
Meyers, Ben Molnar. Zoltan Nagy, Steve Nagy, Mike Olynuk, Pete Svab, Jone
Svab, Charles Siba, Frank Siba, Andrew Siba, Paul Siba Leslie Thompson, Jim
Vanyo, Frank Vanyo, James John Vanyo, Alex Livingston, Cama Livingstone, Norman Kirsch, Wm
Kaun L.C. Kiled in Action March 5 1945

Additionally the Canadian Virtual War Memorial adds a biography about Sergeant Melvin Caspar Tagseth, son of Mathias and Lydia Tagseth, of Middle Lake, Saskatchewan, Canada, gave the supreme sacrifice August 13, 1941 serving with the Royal Canadian Air Force.

Private Lewis Charles Kaun son of Paul A. and Agnes T. (Auchstaetter) Kaun, of Middle Lake, Saskatchewan. died March 5, 1945 while serving with the Stormont, Dundas and Glengarry Highlanders, R.C.I.C. in the army. Kaun is buried at Groesbeek Canadian War Cemetery in the Netherlands.

Aug 072014
 

World War One Remembered at the University of Saskatchewan

Honouring our heroes - Remember Us - University of Saskatchewan Great War Commemoration CommitteeHonourRollAddendum-Professor Dean McNeil trumpet solo-2
Honour Roll Addendum
Professor Dean McNeil Trumpet Solos
On Thursday August 7, 2014 the “Honouring our heroes” program commemorated those students, faculty and staff who fought in the First World War (1914-1918) in Convocation Hall, Peter MacKinnon Building on the University of Saskatchewan Campus. According to the University of Saskatchewan media advisory, Chancellor Emerita Vera Pezer, Interim President and Vice-Chancellor Gordon Barnhart, and history student Eric Story related that this is the first of many commemorative events planned in honour of the centennial year. World War I commenced August 4, 1914.
Pezer recounted that while World War I “produced unprecedented slaughter” of those “sent forth to the Great War”, the effects of the war had a “profound effect upon the province” as well as established a “growing sense of national pride.” “Beyond fighting there were many ways that the University” contributed to the war effort, such as chaplin Edmund Oliver who joined the Western Universities Battalion with the Canadian Expeditionary Force (CEF). Edmund helped to establish the University of Vimy Ridge and worked on the battle fields in France serving the sick, the wounded soldiers, and advising families when enlisted personnel gave the supreme sacrifice.

Honouring our heroes - Remember Us - University of Saskatchewan Great War Commemoration Committee veiled plaques honouring our heroes
Veiled Plaques Honouring our heroes
Honouring our heroes - Remember Us - University of Saskatchewan Great War Commemoration Committee r, Interim President and Vice-Chancellor Gordon Barnhart - history student Eric Story-Chancellor Emerita Vera Pezer
Interim President and Vice-Chancellor Gordon Barnhart, history student Eric Story, Chancellor Emerita Vera Pezer
Honouring our heroes - Remember Us - University of Saskatchewan Great War Commemoration Committee Chancellor Emerita Vera Pezer.
Chancellor Emerita Vera Pezer
Honouring our heroes - Remember Us - University of Saskatchewan Great War Commemoration Committee veiled plaques honouring our heroes Interim President and Vice-Chancellor Gordon Barnhart - history student Eric Story-Chancellor Emerita Vera Pezer
Interim President and Vice-Chancellor Gordon Barnhart, history student Eric Story, Chancellor Emerita Vera Pezer

 

Research conducted by Professor Emeritus of History, Michael Hayden, found those names missing during the original commemoration services held by the University of Saskatchewan. 349 men and one woman are named on the walls of the Peter McKinnon Building National Historic Site of Canada (the former College Building ). Memorial ribbons are inscribed with the names of 298 military personnel, noting additionally those who were wounded wounded, or killed in action. Accompanying the ribbons are 34 names mostly of the Royal Air Force. Another 23 names commemorate the volunteer nurses of the Emmanuel College Hospital who served during the 1918 Influenza Epidemic. The names of 18 service personnel were dedicated at this ceremony on a plaque unveiled August 7, 2014. This plaque will be mounted outside of Convocation Hall and in this way these eighteen heroes of World War I will be honoured prominently in the first building erected on the University of Saskatchewan grounds.

Honouring our heroes - Remember Us - University of Saskatchewan Great War Commemoration Committee slide show
Slide Show
Honouring our heroes - Remember Us - University of Saskatchewan Great War Commemoration Committee Eric Story History Student
Eric Story History Student University of Saskatchewan Great War Commemoration Committee
Honouring our heroes - Remember Us - University of Saskatchewan Great War Commemoration Committee Interview of MichaelHayden at Honouring our Heroes
Interview of MichaelHayden at Honouring our Heroes
Honouring our heroes - Remember Us - University of Saskatchewan Great War Commemoration Committee JGDiefenbakerMemorialRibbon
J.G. Diefenbaker Memorial Ribbon

 

Following speeches given by Pezer, Barnhart and Story, the names of those commemorated on the plaque were read out. The “Last Post” trumpet solo rang out by Professor Dean McNeil. A moment of silence followed and then the “Reveille” trumpet solo rung out paying especial tribute to those students, faculty and staff named upon the plaque.

Barnhart related a lesson taken on by history students where each pupil in the class was assigned a country. The assignment was to “trace through hour by hour and day by day the events leading up to … August 4, 1914, the beginning of the first world war one”. Such an indepth study brings home the politics one hundred years ago, that even though August 4 officially started the war, there were many contributing factors and forces in play which finally gave way to the imminence of war.

Honouring our heroes - Remember Us - University of Saskatchewan Great War Commemoration Committee Memorial Ribbons Admiration
Memorial Ribbons Admiration
Honouring our heroes - Remember Us - University of Saskatchewan Great War Commemoration Committee Petty Officer 1st Class Warren Noble CD Recruiter
University of Saskatchewan
Memorial Ribbons Plaque
Petty Officer 1st Class Warren Noble CD Recruiter
HMCS Unicorn
National Defence
Honouring our heroes - Remember Us - University of Saskatchewan Great War Commemoration Committee Honour Roll Addendum Professor Dean McNeil Trumpet Solos
Honour Roll Addendum ~ Professor Dean McNeil Trumpet Solos
Honouring our heroes - Remember Us - University of Saskatchewan Great War Commemoration Committee Petty Officer 1st Class Warren Noble CD Recruiter Sub Lieutenant Alicia Morris
Petty Officer 1st Class Warren Noble CD Recruiter
Sub Lieutenant Alicia Morris
HMCS Unicorn
National Defence

 

Though the University had only been open for seven years, Barnhart recounts that within three months of the First World War commencement, a recruitment program was in place. Seventy five per cent of the student body saw active service. Alongside students, staff and faculty served in the war effort. So many were absent from the College of Engineering, that it was forced to close during the 1916-7 academic year amid the Great War. Students were given one year’s credit towards their degree program which at the time they felt was a triumphant entitlement as the war was predicted to last short of one year. Faculty positions were held for all those who had enlisted.

During the renovations of the Peter McKinnon building a special insulation was installed over the memorial ribbons which was then encased in plywood casings to preserve the historic carvings. In this way no paint, no hammer nor any construction event could damage the commemorative ribbons.

“War changed Canada,” Barnhart affirmed, “in many ways Canada was no longer a colony”. Canada may have entered the Great War as a colony, however emerged as a country in its own right signing the armistice alongside the Allies of World War I on November 11, 1918.

Honouring our heroes - Remember Us - University of Saskatchewan Great War Commemoration Committee Memorial GSwift-JDCumming-HJBlair-MemorialRibbons
G Swift-J D Cumming-H J Blair-Memorial Ribbons

Story spoke on behalf of the University of Saskatchewan’s Great War Commemoration Committee which is chaired by Professor Emeritus Bill Waiser. This ceremony, the “Remember Us – Honouring our heroes” unveiling ceremony is the inaugural event sponsored by the Great War Commemoration Committee, there will be many more memorial events upcoming in the next four years.

Joseph Boyden has been scheduled to give a talk about two aboriginal snipers of World War I whom he wrote about in the much acclaimed novel, “Three Day Road”. There is in the making the “Great War Soiree” which will feature a theatrical number, and a musical score in tribute to the First World War.

In the works, is a public talk by Brain Gable, University of Saskatchewan alumnus, and award winning cartoonist for the Globe and Mail. Gable depicts editorial or political cartoons, containing commentaries and illustrations relating to the effects that the Great War had on society during the contemporary news releases of the Great War Centenary. His cartoons provide insight into issues and historical context of World War I embracing sensitivity, seriousness and satire on the outcome of events with a point of view 100 years later.

Honouring our heroes - Remember Us - University of Saskatchewan Great War Commemoration Committee College Building Plaque
College Building Plaque
Honouring our heroes - Remember Us - University of Saskatchewan Great War Commemoration Committee Memorial Peter McKinnon Building National Historic Site College Building
Peter McKinnon-(College Building) National Historic Site
Honouring our heroes - Remember Us - University of Saskatchewan Great War Commemoration Committee Peter McKinnon Building -College Building Plaque.
Peter McKinnon Building -College Building Plaque

 

Proposals yet to come from the Great War Commemoration Committee may feature the following. In 2016, a feature based upon the “The Antiques Road Show” will take place showcasing memorabilia, artefacts and antiques from the Great War. A culinary week is in progress studying the recipes and foods sustaining the appetites during the First World War years. Finally in 2018, the University of Saskatchewan Archives website will be completed and expanded with an grand ceremony unveiling featured topics such as “How to research”, blogs and articles on the Great War.

While Story suggests these as tantalizing morsels of events yet to come over the next four years, this is by no means an exhaustive list. To follow more about plans undertaken by the Great War Commemoration Committee please see their facebook page and twitter page online.

World War I ~ “The war to end all wars”~ how is it remembered? The Great War Commemoration Committee tackles the issues, the evolution, and culture of the war years, and its impact on the University and its role in the greater community of the city of Saskatoon, the province of Saskatchewan the nation of Canada on the world stage. The evolution of the University was inevitable and dramatic during the war years contrasting sharply with the life of contemporary students, faculty and staff. The University of Saskatchewan’s motto Deo et Patriæ (Latin) translates to For God and Country.‘Deo et Patriae’ has been the guiding slogan of the university since its foundation, and the strength and fervor of that slogan were amply demonstrated during the dark years of the War, when students and professors marched shoulder to shoulder in the grim chaos of Flanders.”
Saskatoon Star Phoenix [Saskatoon Daily Star] July 15, 1926.

UNIVERSITY OF SASKATCHEWAN HONOUR ROLL ADDENDUM
Andrew Melville Anderson
Albert F. Bailey
Louis Brehaut 28th Bn.
John Rich Bunn Can. Army Med. Corps.
Harry Ray Contelon 1st Univ. Co., PPCLI,D
William Kenneth Forbes
J.W. French R.A.F.
General Middleton Grant 1st Depot Bn.
David Robert Green 1st Depot Bn., R.F.C.
William James Hall
William Cameron MacIntosh 28th Bn., 65th Overseas BN.
Kenneth McKenzie 196th Bn.
Vernon Ulysses Miner
Andrew Ernest Stewart
Robert Stewart 65th Bn, 72nd Bn, Wounded.
George Moir Weir
John McIntyre White Y.M.C.A. 46th Bn
Paul Peter Wiklund 44th Bn., Killed

 

BIBLIOGRAPHY:

Adamson, Julia. Archives ~Resources National, Provincial, City, and University archives. Saskatchewan Gen Web. April 10, 2014. Date accessed August 7,2014.

Adamson, Julia. Libraries Resources Saskatchewan Gen Web. April 10, 2014. Date accessed August 7,2014.

Adamson, Julia. War and Military resources Saskatchewan Gen Web. April 10, 2014. Date accessed August 7,2014.

Adamson, Julia Millions of Archival Newspaper Pages set to go online Saskatchewan Gen Web E~Magazine May 27, 2014. Date accessed August 7,2014.

Adamson, Julia. Michelle Lang. Canadian Journalist. Jan. 31, 1975-Dec 30, 2009. Afghanistan Casualty. Saskatchewan Gen Web E~Magazine November 11, 2012. Date accessed August 7,2014.

Adamson, Julia. Naval Monument honours Royal Canadian Navy prairie seamen and RCN ships. H.M.C.S. Regina (K234) and H.M.C.S. Weyburn (K 173) Saskatchewan Gen Web E~Magazine September 25, 2013. Date accessed August 7,2014.

Adamson, Julia. Montgomery Place Est. in 1946 by Our War Veterans. Saskatchewan Gen Web E~Magazine. October 9, 2013. Date accessed August 7,2014.

Adamson Julia. H.W. Balfour’s Truly Impressive Career. Recognized for Outstanding Civic Service and Meritorious Military Achievement. Saskatchewan Gen Web E~Magazine April 7, 2013 Date accessed August 7,2014.

Barnhart, Gordon. Oliver, Edmund H. (1882–1935) Encyclopedia of Saskatchewan. Canadian Plains Research Center. University of Regina. 2006. Date accessed August 7,2014.

Biber, Francois. Saskatoon Great War Memorial last of its kind in Canada. What began in 1923 remaing and has grown to more than 1,200 memorials CJME news. August 6, 2014. Date accessed August 7, 2014.

Brian Gable. Wikipedia the free encyclopedia. July 30, 2013. Date accessed August 7, 2014.

Brian Gable Editorial Cartoonist Bio. The Globe and Mail. June 3, 2009. Date accessed August 7, 2014.

Brian Gable on Facebook Date accessed August 7, 2014.

Coggins, Jack. A Chaplain’s War. Edmund Henry Oliver and the University of Vimy Ridge, 1916-1919 (pdf) Univeristy of Saskatchewan Library Archives. History Department Essays 2004. Date accessed August 7,2014.

Dawson, Anna-Lilja. The U of S held strong through the World Wars. The Sheaf. November 7, 2013. Date accessed August 7, 2014.

England declares war on Germany The Guardian. August 5, 1914. Date accessed August 7, 2014.

Eric Story on Facebook Eric Story (The_RealEAS) on Twitter Date accessed August 7,2014.

Ferguson, Mark. The University of Saskatchewan will rename the historic College Building to the Peter MacKinnon Building to honour the outgoing U of S President. University of Saskatchewan News. June 14, 2012. Date accessed August 7,2014.

Gable, Brian 1949- Something about the author, Scholarly Magazines, Encyclopedia.com. January 2009. Date accessed August 7,2014.

Globe and Mail on Twitter (#globeandmail) ‘The war to end all wars’: Today’s editorial cartoon by Brian Gable. Date accessed August 7,2014.

Great War Commemoration Committee on Facebook. Date accessed August 7,2014.

Great War Commomoration Committee on Twitter (#GWCP306) Date accessed August 7,2014.

Halliwell, J. Joseph Boyden. The Agenda with Steve Paikin. Video. Joseph Boyden: First Nations and the First World War July 31, 2014. Author Joseph Boyden discusses the important role Aboriginals played in the First World War, and the real-life Ojibwe soldier that inspired his novel “Three Day Road.”2014. The Ontario Educational Communications Authority (TVO) Date accessed August 7,2014.

Harvey, Alban.
Joseph Boyden The Canadian Encyclopedia. Aboriginal Peoples. March 6, 2014. Date accessed August 7,2014.

Hayden, Michael. Why Are All Those Names on the Wall? The University of Saskatchewan and World War I. Saskatchewan History 58, no. 2 (2006): 4.14.

Higher Education. The University of Saskatchewan: The Start Saskatchewan News Index. Top News Stories. University of Saskatchewan Library. Date accessed August 7, 2014.

Joseph Boyden. Wikipedia The free encyclopedia. March 7, 2014. Date accessed August 7, 2014.

Lacey, Dana. Documents show Harper;s extreme political control The Canadian Journalism Project. June 8, 2010. Date accessed August 7, 2014.

Long-lost names added to U of S War Memorial. 18 names will be added to the Roll of Honor. August 6, 2014. Date accessed August 7, 2014.

Mattern, Ashleigh. Alumnus Profile: Brian Gable, editorial cartoonist for the Globe and Mail. Centennial Committee. April 16, 2012. The Sheaf, One Hundred Years.Date accessed August 7, 2014.

Nurse, Donna Bailey. Joseph Boyden Author Profile. Way of the Warrior. Joseph Boyden brings new voice to First World War epic. Quill and Quire, Canada’s magazine of Book News and Reviews. Date accessed August 7, 2014.

Pitsula, James M. Manly Heroes: The University of Saskatchewan and the First World War. In Paul Stortz and E. Lisa Panayotidis, eds., Cultures, Communities, and Conflict: Histories of Canadian Universities and War. University of Toronto Press, 2012.

Preston, Richard. First World War centenary: how the events of August 1, 1914 unfolded. Telegraph. August 1, 2014. Date accessed August 7, 2014

Preston, Richard. First World War centenary: how the events of August 2, 1914 unfolded. Telegraph. August 2, 2014. Date accessed August 7, 2014

Preston, Richard. First World War centenary: how the events of August 3, 1914 unfolded. Telegraph. August 3, 2014. Date accessed August 7, 2014

Preston, Richard. First World War centenary: how the events of August 4, 1914 unfolded. Telegraph. August 4, 2014. Date accessed August 7, 2014

Remember Us Great War Commemoration project begins with plaque unveiling. Facebook.
Remember Us. University of Saskatchewan Great War Commemoration Project begins with plaque unveiling University of Saskatchewan News. Date accessed August 7, 2014.

Sibbald, Kirk. Cartoons and Calculus. Green and White. FAll 2010. Features. University of Saskatchewan. Date accessed August 7, 2014.

Stoon Great War on twitter (#StoonGreatWar) Date accessed August 7, 2014.

Story, Eric. Saskatchewan History online. Date accessed August 7, 2014.

Streck, Aaron. Eighteen alumni names complete U of S commemoration from WWI Global News. Shaw Media Inc. August 7, 2014. Date accessed August 7, 2014.

University remembers those who served in First World War. CTV news. August 7, 2014. Date accessed August 7, 2014.

University of Saskatchewan Great War on Twitter (#usaskGW) Date accessed August 7, 2014.

University of Saskatchewan honours students, faculty and staff who fought in WWI August 7, 2014. University of SAskatchewan News. August 7, 2014. Date accessed August 7, 2014.

Three Day Road [This novel written by Joseph Boyden follows the journey of two young Cree men, Xavier and Elijah, who volunteer for that war and become snipers during World War I] Wikipedia the free encyclopedia. August 2, 2014. Date accessed August 7, 2014.

Waiser, Bill. Opinion: Let’s protect future census data. Edmonton Journal Reprinted by the Ottawa Citizen. May 26, 2014. Date accessed August 7, 2014.

World War I Campus History. University of Saskatchewan. University Library. University Archives and Special Collections. Date accessed August 7, 2014.

Database at World War I:

  • Killed, died or wounded
  • U of S affiliation at enlistment
  • Batallion/unit at enlistment
  • Batallion/unit – all assignments
  • U of S College
  • Date of death
  • Decoration type
  • Rank

World War one Centenary on Twitter. (#wwicentenary) Date accessed August 7, 2014.
Stewart, Les. Why won’t this federal government support our invisibly wounded soldiers? Cartoon from the Globe and Mail by Brian Gable, re posted by the Springwater Park Citizen’s Coalition, a sustainbale business plan for Springwater Provincial Park in Midhurst, Ontario. December 20, 2013. Date accessed August 7, 2014.

WWI Canada Centennial Commemoration on facebook Date accessed August 7, 2014.

Jul 302014
 

Foam Lake Branch No. 16 Royal Canadian Legion came together on November 22, 1919 under the name, Great War Veterans Association. This branch represented the towns of Foam Lake, Elfros, Leslie, Tuffnell, Sheho and Kelliher. The Foam Lake Auxiliary to Royal Canadian Legion NO. 16 was formed in 1931. Within the book, They Came from Many Lands. A History of Foam Lake and Area, there is a compilation of Honour Rolls for the communities of Foam Lake, Tuffnell, Sheho and Leslie, Saskatchewan.

1914-1918. William Littlewood, Fred Neath, Magnus Olafson, George Sargent, Percy Sargent, James Sharman, and Olifur Arnason, Frank Cummings, George Barrie, Hubet Tapscott, Jack Campbell, William Ferguson, James Streeton, George H. Wood, Thorstein Thorsteinson, E.S. Anderson, J. Adamson D.C.M., J. Vlave, Harry Davis, Herbert Davis, L. Dobson, C. Garland S.P., S.P. Gislason, A. Green D.C.M., B. Hart, G.H. Howe, A. Inglis M. Medal, S. lindal, J. Lindal, C. Milton, R. Pickering, K. Scott, Harry Scutchings M. Medal, Th. Sigurdson.

1939-1945 Wilton Armour, Alister Cumming, James Fichtner, Hugh Gilchrist, Clifford Harrison, Frank Pankratz, Fred Reynolds, Roy Stillwell, Peter Wunder, William Oleksuik, David Pratt, Alan Scramsted, Hugh Gilchrist, Randal Gould, Norman Leckie, Hector Monroe, Walter Fedorchuk, Joseph Sackney, Harry Sawchuk, William Butula, A. Harris, H. Larson, Fred Rynolds, M.C. Taseth, D. West, K.M. Eyolfson, Harry Clark.

Korean War. Robert Craig.

Also listed are those who served during the first and second world wars, as well as those on active service as of December of 1911.

Within this local history book is a photograph of military personnel at Camp Hughes in 1916 who served in the No. 16 Platoon, 214th Overseas Battalion. This Battalion was mobilized out of Wadena in 1916.

In 1951, The Foam Lake Branch of the Royal Canadian Legion took it upon themselves to sponsor the Royal Canadian Air Cadet Squadron No. 542 operating out of Foam Lake.

Foam Lake locates at the intersection of Saskatchewan highways 16 and 310 at the south west quarter of section 32 township 30 range 11 west of the second meridian. Located nearby are the villages of Leslie south east quarter of section 36 township 31 range 13 west of the second meridian, Sheho north east section 9 township 30 range 9 west of the second meridian and Tufnell southwest section 33 township 30 range 10 west of the second meridian.

Praising what is lost makes the remembrance dear.
~William Shakespeare

BIBLIOGRAPHY
Adamson, Julia. Township Range, Meridian, Homestead Location Saskatchewan Gen Web. December 2, 2013. Date accessed July 30, 2014.

Bill Barry, Geographic Names of Saskatchewan (Regina: People Places Publishing, 2005) ISBN 1-897020-19-2.

They Came from Many Lands. A History of Foam Lake and Area. Compiled by The Foam Lake Historical Society, 1985. Published by the Foam Lake Review, Foam lake, SK.

The Royal Canadian Legion Saskatchewan Command Commemorative history book. (pdf) 1926-2006. A collection of memories, activities, and community commitment from our branches and members throughout the province.